Pressure Washingin Daniel Island, SC

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Pressure Washing Daniel Island, SC

Daniel Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Daniel Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Daniel Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Daniel Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Daniel Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Daniel Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Daniel Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Daniel Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Daniel Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Daniel Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Daniel Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Daniel Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Daniel Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Daniel Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Daniel Island, we work with business owners across Daniel Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Daniel Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Daniel Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Daniel Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Daniel Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Daniel Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Daniel Island, SC

Phase II of The Waterfront moves forward

The Waterfront developers, East West Partners, recently commenced the sales process of Phase II of the development. The three new buildings slated for Phase II of development will offer direct, unobstructed, four-story views of the Wando River.The new buildings — named the Sabal, Magnolia and Camellia — will feature one, two, and three-bedroom residences with a total of 41 units.The Waterfront development is a six phase development located along the Wando River where River Landing Drive dead ends into Waterfront Par...

The Waterfront developers, East West Partners, recently commenced the sales process of Phase II of the development. The three new buildings slated for Phase II of development will offer direct, unobstructed, four-story views of the Wando River.

The new buildings — named the Sabal, Magnolia and Camellia — will feature one, two, and three-bedroom residences with a total of 41 units.

The Waterfront development is a six phase development located along the Wando River where River Landing Drive dead ends into Waterfront Park. Four more phases of construction on the 22-acre site are planned. When The Waterfront is fully completed there will be a total of 300 living spaces.

This sales release comes slightly before the one-year anniversary of completion of The Waterfront’s Phase I. The first phase of construction was done simultaneously with updates to the park and existing pier and construction of a second piers — all of which included a paddle board launch, an interactive fountain, waterfront swings, children’s play area, and the construction of five large building that include condominiums and townhomes.

Fifty-seven units are occupied and one two-bedroom unit is

still available. Prices for the sold units ranged from $999,000 to $1.9 million.

Ranging from approximately 1,220 to 3,400 square feet, each of the Phase II floorplans feature outdoor living terraces, elevated finishes, and river views. Amenities include a shared, elevated outdoor courtyard for residents of the Sabal and Magnolia buildings and an outdoor terrace and gathering space called The Perch for residents of the Camellia building.

East West Partners will begin accepting contracts in March.

“As we begin the next phase of construction at The Waterfront, we couldn’t be more excited to continue the growth of this vibrant community and create an environment that will resonate for generations to come,” said Miller Harper, managing partner of East West Partners.

As a complement to the next step of The Waterfront’s development, construction of a pavilion at Waterfront Park has begun, according to the Daniel Island Property Owners’ Association President Jane Baker. The pavilion will be located near the oak trees in the grassy area of the park where the guitar series was held last summer.

During the construction of Phase II, The Waterfront trail will be rerouted but it’s anticipated that the connection to Barfield Park will remain. A trail plan that goes from the South Dock to the Barfield Bridge is still being finalized, according to Baker.

East West Partners does not anticipate any disruptions to usage of the docks or any of the amenities at Waterfront Park. There is no set timeline for the completion of Phase II.

SCDNR's Baltimore Oriole Winter Survey set Feb. 18-21

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) will conduct its annual Baltimore Oriole Winter Survey Feb. 18-21 in conjunction with the Great Backyard Bird Count. The state natural resources agency is interested in the status and distribution of these colorful songbirds that are wintering in the Palmetto State.If you currently have Baltimore orioles coming to your feeders or have had them in the past years, SCDNR encourages your participation. Survey participants count and record the largest number of Baltimore orioles they can see...

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) will conduct its annual Baltimore Oriole Winter Survey Feb. 18-21 in conjunction with the Great Backyard Bird Count. The state natural resources agency is interested in the status and distribution of these colorful songbirds that are wintering in the Palmetto State.

If you currently have Baltimore orioles coming to your feeders or have had them in the past years, SCDNR encourages your participation. Survey participants count and record the largest number of Baltimore orioles they can see at one time, on one, two, three or all four days of the survey period. Even if you cannot participate during the survey period, SCDNR would still like to record your oriole numbers seen during the winter months of December through February.

Survey participants need to be able to correctly identify Baltimore orioles from other bird species. To participate, you can access the survey form and materials from the link. The survey form and materials are available through your web browser or through the Survey 123 app (free download through your device’s app store). Contact Lex Glover at [email protected] if you have any questions about the oriole survey, or for more information on the Great Backyard Bird Count and counting all species of birds, visit http://gbbc.birdcount.org/.

This will be the seventh annual survey, and South Carolina continues to report the largest number of wintering Baltimore orioles in the country. Usually, these birds would winter in southern Florida, the Caribbean, Central and South America. However, during the last several decades, they have been wintering along the East Coast in greater abundance. Last year’s Great Backyard Bird Count results had sightings in 21 states, ranging along the East Coast from Massachusetts to Florida, across the Gulf Coast states to Texas and in California. Reports were even received from New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Ontario! The bulk of the birds reported were from the East Coast, from Virginia to Florida.

In the 2021 survey, South Carolina’s Baltimore Oriole Winter Survey data combined with the Great Backyard Bird Count data had South Carolina with the largest numbers of orioles in the country. The Palmetto State had 182 reports, the highest number of reports in the country (28 percent of the total number of reports) and 859 orioles tallied, (42 percent of the total number of orioles reported in the country). This was South Carolina’s largest count to date.

South Carolina had 16 counties reporting orioles last year. The majority of them wintered along the coastal plain from Myrtle Beach to Hilton Head Island. The hot spot was the Charleston, Berkeley, and Dorchester counties area, where 72 percent of the state’s orioles were tallied last year. Good numbers continued to extend inland, and the Upstate continues to report a few orioles. A first for the survey, since it began in 2015, was a report from Oconee County.

Though SCDNR is not sure why these birds have begun overwintering in large numbers in the state, they are responding well to the popularity of backyard bird feeding. Orioles are best attracted to feeders where the homeowner is already feeding birds in general. Orioles are attracted to the activity of other birds at feeders. If conditions are right for them, they are likely to frequent the feeders where they can find food, water, and shelter. They will eat a variety of foods and seeds, suet products, some seed mixes, nuts and fruit mixes, but their favorite food by far is grape jelly. Since these birds have become more common at the winter feeders, you can find an assortment of feeders that cater to them and their foods, especially at bird-feeding specialty stores.

The survey will enable scientists to learn the distribution and abundance of Baltimore orioles wintering in South Carolina. Information from the survey and the Great Backyard Bird Count can provide a “big picture” about what is happening to Baltimore oriole populations and other bird species. SCDNR appreciates the public’s support and efforts in helping collect the valuable information in this survey.

Local Girl Scouts continue to crush cookie sales

Every January, thousands of girls across the country kick off the start of Girl Scout cookie season. The young entrepreneurs sell their delicious wares in order to earn badges, raise money for their troops, and give back to their community.Diane Flanagan is CEO of the Girl Scouts of Eastern South Carolina, a council that includes nearly 200 Girl Scout troops of all ages from Myrtle Beach to Hilton Head to Orangeburg.The Daniel Island resident oversees the entire cookie selling operation: she coordinates between the factory bake...

Every January, thousands of girls across the country kick off the start of Girl Scout cookie season. The young entrepreneurs sell their delicious wares in order to earn badges, raise money for their troops, and give back to their community.

Diane Flanagan is CEO of the Girl Scouts of Eastern South Carolina, a council that includes nearly 200 Girl Scout troops of all ages from Myrtle Beach to Hilton Head to Orangeburg.

The Daniel Island resident oversees the entire cookie selling operation: she coordinates between the factory bakers, the transport of cookies from the factory to local warehouses, and the distribution of cookies to individual troop leaders. It’s a lesson in logistics that has proved more challenging than ever this year with supply chain issues such as truck driver and warehouse worker shortages nationwide, as well as delays due to COVID-19.

“The demand is crazy this year,” Flanagan said. “People just crave that familiarity and comfort of a Girl Scout cookie.”

She said promotion of their new cookie, Adventurefuls, as well as media reports about cookie shortages have also driven up demand for the beloved baked goods that are only available for a limited time.

With a background as an engineer in the automotive industry, Flanagan is quick to calculate the numbers: The council ordered 94,000 cases of cookies this year, which translates to 1.15 million boxes sold. “I’m incredibly proud of all the volunteers and the girls,” she said of their hard work setting goals and selling more cookies than anyone expected.

Carol Braswell has been involved with her daughter’s Girl Scout troop since she started as a Daisy in 2010. Over the years, Troop 705 on Daniel Island has had as many as 25 girls at all levels — Daisy, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes. This year, Braswell and co-leader Kelly Hood have four girls in the troop — a 13-year-old working toward her Silver Award and three high schoolers working toward their Gold Award, the equivalent to Boy Scouts’ Eagle Award.

“Our girls enjoy selling cookies together at the cookie booths. They also love choosing a charity and donating part of their proceeds to that charity,” Braswell said.

Jacqueline Classey is navigating cookie season as a first year leader with Troop 3326, which is made up of nine first graders who meet at Philip Simmons Elementary School. Getting to interact with the community has been rewarding for these 6 and 7 year old Daisy Scouts. “If you stop by our booth you won’t get by without a 10 minute chat with one of our girls,” Classey said. “Seeing them at the cookie booths has been so fun! I mean, just watching them chat about their favorite cookies to the people that come up has been my favorite part.”

For Flanagan, the entrepreneurial aspect of cookie sales helps instill business skills and boosts girls’ confidence. “We teach girls how to lead their lives,” she said.

Braswell has seen this firsthand with her troop. “They have learned to become small business owners through cookies sales — making a plan to sell cookies door to door, virtual or with cookie booths — responsible for collecting, counting and turning in money, and making sure they have the cookies they need to deliver. It has been fun and rewarding watching them grow over the years.”

For more information, visit girlscoutsesc.org.

Of the 111 councils nationwide, Girl Scouts of Eastern South Carolina was ranked 7th highest for the average number of cookie boxes sold per girl in 2021.

Berkeley County School District 2021-22 Teachers of the Year

It takes a special type of person to be a teacher. It takes an exceptional educator to be named one of the Teachers of the Year for the Berkeley County School District for the school year of 2021-22.Teachers serving Daniel Island School, Cainhoy Elementary, and Philip Simmons Elementary, Middle and High schools have gone above and beyond the guidelines of their curriculum. Find out more about these individuals who have been recognized for their contributions to their schools.Kindergarten teacherQ: Describe the personal h...

It takes a special type of person to be a teacher. It takes an exceptional educator to be named one of the Teachers of the Year for the Berkeley County School District for the school year of 2021-22.

Teachers serving Daniel Island School, Cainhoy Elementary, and Philip Simmons Elementary, Middle and High schools have gone above and beyond the guidelines of their curriculum. Find out more about these individuals who have been recognized for their contributions to their schools.

Kindergarten teacher

Q: Describe the personal honor of being named your school’s Teacher of the Year.

A: I’ve been a kindergarten teacher at DIS for 17 years. I love this community and the relationships I’ve made over the years. I’m humbled to be named the 2022 Teacher of the Year.

Q: Describe the qualities/attributes that best exemplify you as an educator.

A: I am patient. I am flexible, yet structured.

Q: What is a teaching method that you created or feel is unique to you?

A: I love motivating students by encouraging creativity. We create learning opportunities that involve choices. This enables students to take ownership and responsibility for their learning.

Q: What would your students/peers say about your character outside of the classroom?

A: I think my students would say that I care about them. I think my peers would say that I love teaching kindergarten.

Q: What advice would you give to those striving for such an award that displays success in academia?

A: Continue to grow and develop as an educator. Try new ideas. Some will work well, and some ideas will fail. Your failures are just as valuable. You will learn to modify and adjust.

Grades 9-12, math teacher

Q: Describe the personal honor of being named your school’s Teacher of the Year.

A: It is quite the honor to receive the Teacher of the Year award for Philip Simmons High School. Every day I enter a building with incredible teachers that have passion for their subject and profession. I am constantly inspired by teachers at PSHS and it’s an incredible

honor and that my coworkers have voted me the Teacher of the Year when they are so amazing.

Q: Describe the qualities/attributes that best exemplify you as an educator.

A: Qualities and attributes that best exemplify m?yself as an educator are compassion, empathy, adaptability, patience, and collaboration.

Q: What is a teaching method that you created or feel is unique to you?

A: A teaching method that I believe is unique to my classroom is the fun factor. I try to incorporate as many activities as possible that allow students to have fun and build their team work skills as they study the math.

Q: What would your students/peers say about your character outside of the classroom?

A: Outside of the classroom, peers and students would describe me as devoted, kind, patient, and optimistic.

Q: What advice would you give to those striving for such an award that displays success in academia?

A: Advice I would give to those striving for such an award is to set goals for yourself and students. Hold your students to a high standard, they will always rise to your standards. Practice self-evaluation to enhance the education your students receive. Talk and build relationships with your coworkers, use them to seek feedback/advice and brainstorm ideas with them.

Q: Describe the personal honor of being named your school’s Teacher of the Year.

A: It is a great honor to represent a school so rich in diversity, imagination, and creativity. I am excited to represent my school by continuing the tradition of excellence in our hallways.

Q: Describe the qualities/attributes that best exemplify you as an educator.

A: If I had to describe myself in a few words as an educator, I would say determined, engaging, and relationship-oriented.

Q: What is a teaching method that you created or feel is unique to you?

A: I love to teach my students about the brain and how they can use that understanding to benefit them as students. By instructing them about neuroplasticity, growth mindset, and grit, my students become equipped to tackle the challenges and obstacles of school and everyday life.

Q: What would your students/peers say about your character outside of the classroom?

A: “Mr. McCall cares about his students, the community, and the environment in which we live and work.” “His character is a strong disposition towards justice and always doing what is best for others.” “I look up to Mr. McCall because he is relatable and understands where we are coming from when we enter his classroom.”

Q: What advice would you give to those striving for such an award that displays success in academia?

A: For those who wish to be Teacher of the Year in the future, I would say find what makes you passionate about education and run with it. If a lesson or strategy doesn’t spark joy in your being, drop it and find something that does. When you find an engaging way to reach your students that you find value in, your students will naturally follow your lead.

Q: Describe the personal honor of being named your school’s Teacher of the Year.

A: I am honored to have been chosen as Cainhoy Elementary’s teacher of the year. Being chosen reassured me that the work I am doing for my students has been noticed and is appreciated.

Q: Describe the qualities/attributes that best exemplify you as an educator.

A: I believe the qualities that exemplify me as an educator are dedicated, adaptable, and caring. The field of education is constantly changing, and I believe that it is important to be able to adapt to those changes. When you love what you do, you automatically care!

Q: What is a teaching method that you created, or feel is unique to you?

A: As a teacher I strive to provide my students with lessons that are fun and engaging. I have a love for music, so I incorporate music into my lessons and classroom environment. My students and I truly enjoy listening to the sounds of music as we learn and work.

Q: What would your students/peers say about your character outside of the classroom?

A: I believe that my students and peers would say that my character is the same both in and out of the classroom. My students would say that I am fun and relatable. I believe that my peers would describe me as a dependable colleague.

Q: What advice would you give to those striving for such an award that displays success in academia?

A: My biggest piece of advice would be to keep on swimming. Being an educator has become a challenging job. I believe that to achieve success within this career field we must strive to assure that we lay a solid foundation for our students and their futures.

Q: Describe the personal honor of being named your school’s Teacher of the Year.

A: I am extremely humbled and honored to be PSES’s Teacher of the Year. We have an amazing group of educators at our school, and I have learned so much from them. To be recognized by such a talented group is a tremendous honor.

Q: Describe the qualities/attributes that best exemplify you as an educator.

A: Recently, our PTA asked students about their teachers. One of mine responded that I was, “kind, patient, and super funny.” Those words are exactly what I want to be like as a teacher. My goal is for students to know they are loved and respected. I’m always looking for innovative ways to make the learning personalized and fun!

Q: What is a teaching method that you created or feel is unique to you?

A: BCSD has helped me grow by focusing on personalized learning. With this method, my students recognize how they learn best and have individualized learner pathways. My teaching style is not a “one size fits all” model. I believe in meeting students where they are at. Learning should be engaging and relevant. I regularly incorporate project based learning and STEAM instructional approaches in my classroom.

Q: What would your students/peers say about your character outside of the classroom?

A: I’m optimistic, relational, and supportive. I always try to find the good in any situation. I believe in building strong relationships within the community. I actively support community events at all three Philip Simmons schools. What I love best about the Philip Simmons community is just that — we are a strong community that comes together for our kids.

Q: What advice would you give to those striving for such an award that displays success in academia?

A: I would tell them to always remember your WHY. We became teachers to make positive impacts on our students and communities. Stay student focused and never lose a willingness to learn yourself. Jim Knight, a leader in instructional coaching and education, said it best, “When teachers stop learning, so do students.” Remember that ALL students and teachers are capable of learning something new each day.

Lady Bishops fall shy in Lower State Championship

The Bishop England High School girls’ basketball team held the top sophomore in the country to nearly half of her usual point production. And, the Bishops played inspired basketball, using a never-quit attitude and a stingy defense after falling behind by double digits early in the game.But it still wasn’t enough as Camden gained a 47-33 victory over the Battling Bishops on Monday night at the Florence Civic Center to win the Class AAA Lower State Championship.The Bulldogs, who improved to 21-6, reached the state ch...

The Bishop England High School girls’ basketball team held the top sophomore in the country to nearly half of her usual point production. And, the Bishops played inspired basketball, using a never-quit attitude and a stingy defense after falling behind by double digits early in the game.

But it still wasn’t enough as Camden gained a 47-33 victory over the Battling Bishops on Monday night at the Florence Civic Center to win the Class AAA Lower State Championship.

The Bulldogs, who improved to 21-6, reached the state championship game for the first time since 1982. They will play defending state champ Keenan at 6 p.m. on Friday at the USC Aiken Convocation Center.

Bishop England, seeking its first state title since 2019, finished with a 19-7 record after losing to Keenan in last year’s Class AAA title game.

The game featured Camden’s Joyce Edwards, a 6-3 forward who is the top sophomore in the country, according to ESPN Hoop Gurlsz’ rankings for the class of 2024.

Edwards, who recently reached the 2,000-point mark for her illustrious career, entered the game leading the Bulldogs in five of six major statistical categories, including 23.4 points per game.

But the Bishops defended her well, holding the co-Class AAA state player of the year to 14 points. However, Deanna Jeffcoat and Morgan Champion both picked up the scoring slack with 13 points apiece.

All-state selections Ella Schar and Ally Dominiak led the Bishops with 12 and 11 points, respectively.

Both Camden and Bishop England entered the game on impressive rolls of success. Bishop England won 12 consecutive games heading into the showdown. Camden’s victory Monday night pushed its winning streak to 17 in a row.

The Bulldogs used 3-point shooting to win. Their first three baskets of the game were 3-pointers, and they finished with seven from behind the arc for the contest.

The three 3-point shots helped Camden take a 15-4 lead at the end of the first quarter. The Bulldogs pushed the lead to 22-12 at halftime, and put the game out of reach midway through the third quarter with a 35-18 advantage.

The Bishops were arguably the team of the 2010s, winning six state titles in the decade, including 2012, 2014-17 and 2019. The Bishops’ playoff record from 2012 to Monday night now is 44-5. Beginning with the 2011-12 season, Bishop England owns a 247-37 record for a winning rate of 87%.

The Bishops advanced to the Lower State Championship with a 47-35 victory over Loris on Feb. 24.

The Bishops took a 13-8 lead at the end of the first period, increasing their advantage to 29-17 at halftime en route to the road win. Dominiak and Schar led the Bishops with 14 points apiece.

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