Pressure Washingin James Island, SC

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Pressure Washing James Island, SC

James Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like James Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean James Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in James Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in James Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in James Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in James Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
James Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean James Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in James Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in James Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in James Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in James Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in James Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean James Island, we work with business owners across James Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in James Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in James Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean James Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in James Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in James Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in James Island, SC

James Island’s Andy Miele aims for Olympic gold with Team USA hockey

At a recent Monday night skate featuring retired South Carolina Stingray players, Dave Seitz wore a Team USA hockey jacket and talked smack.“Our team produces Olympians,” Seitz said to the opposing pickup squad. “What are you guys producing?”Seitz’s Olympian reference was to James Island resident Andy Miele, who is in Beijing, China, playing for Team USA in the Winter Olympics. When he is in town, Miele skates on Seitz’s line on Monday nights.“It’s a good laugh, but we&rsqu...

At a recent Monday night skate featuring retired South Carolina Stingray players, Dave Seitz wore a Team USA hockey jacket and talked smack.

“Our team produces Olympians,” Seitz said to the opposing pickup squad. “What are you guys producing?”

Seitz’s Olympian reference was to James Island resident Andy Miele, who is in Beijing, China, playing for Team USA in the Winter Olympics. When he is in town, Miele skates on Seitz’s line on Monday nights.

“It’s a good laugh, but we’re just so proud of him,” Seitz said. “I can’t wait for them to start playing so we can see Andy play ... I love watching Olympic hockey, but it’s just another whole level when you’ve played with somebody and it’s a friend of yours.”

Miele, 33, has fit right into Charleston’s version of hockey culture since he and his wife, Hilary, moved to James Island about six years ago. Miele won college hockey’s version of the Heisman Trophy (the Hobey Baker Award) in 2011 at Miami (Ohio) University. The couple needed a home base while he pursued a pro career that’s ranged from the NHL to Sweden and Russia.

Hilary grew up in Atlanta but has family in Charleston, and her own family often vacationed in the Lowcountry.

“About five or six years ago, we took the car and went on a trip to a couple of different locations down in Florida and in Charleston, trying to figure out where we wanted to stay,” Miele said Feb. 9 from Beijing. “Charleston was by far No. 1. So a couple of months later, we bought a place here and now it’s our home.”

Since 2017, Miele has played with two clubs in the Swedish Hockey League (Malmö Redhawks and Växjö Lakers), Tucson of the American Hockey League, and with Torpedo Nizhny Novgorod of the Kontinental Hockey League, widely considered the No. 2 league in the world behind the NHL.

While he’s at home, Miele can often be found at the North Charleston Coliseum or the Carolina Ice Palace, skating with current and future Stingrays.

“It’s funny, because the hockey world in general is very small,” Miele said. “So as soon as I got to Charleston, I felt like I met every Stingray who’s ever played there, and every current Stingray. It’s been awesome to feel right at home right away.”

‘She’s the engine’

Miele is from Grosse Pointe, Michigan, and played college hockey at Miami University. Despite his relatively small stature (5-7, 169 pounds), he won the Hobey Baker Award in 2011, when he led the nation in scoring with 24 goals and 47 assists. He also was named USA Hockey’s college player of the year.

Miele went undrafted by the NHL, but has played in 15 NHL games in three different stints with Phoenix. Since leaving college, he’s played for seven clubs around the world.

He and Hilary were married in 2016, had a daughter (Bonnie) in 2019 and are currently expecting a second child. The husband and wife try to talk twice a day while Andy is in Beijing, which is 13 hours ahead of Charleston time.

Hilary and Bonnie traveled to Russia with Andy last year for his stint with Torpedo Nizhny Novgorod.

“She is an absolute trooper,” Andy said of his wife. “Without her, all this would not be possible. I always say, ‘She’s the engine and I’m the car.’ She does so much with the logistics of getting everything we need over there and everything back. She’s the brains behind the operation, and she enjoys it, too, because we get to travel a little bit.

“She definitely makes a lot more sacrifices for my career than I do, and I’m so blessed to have her and my daughter in my life and with me when we are in season.”

Olympic hockey

Upon arrival in Beijing, Miele tested positive for COVID-19. Further tests were negative, and he’s back practicing with the squad as Team USA prepares for its first preliminary game against China (Feb. 10 at 8:10 a.m. on USA Network). With the NHL choosing not to pause its season for the Olympics this year, Team USA is made up of pros like Miele and college players.

“Obviously, everyone wants to see the NHL guys,” he said. “But outside the NHL, there’s still a lot of really good hockey, and the league in Russia (KHL) is considered one of the best in the world, if not the best outside of the NHL.

“It’s going to be really good hockey, and fast-paced because the rink is smaller than what it normally is in Europe and in the Olympics. There’s a lot of future NHL players in this tournament, and a lot of past NHL players, too.”

In Beijing, Miele has stayed in the Olympic Village with Team USA.

“It’s been great,” he said. “The Village is really nice, with great rooms. There’s five players to an apartment, and we each have our own room. We’re all within walking distance of each other. The cafeteria is nice. We eat a lot of the same food, but we’re creatures of habit anyway, so it’s not too different. It’s been a great experience, and I can’t say enough good things about it.”

Preliminary games continue Feb. 12 against Canada and Feb. 13 against Germany before qualification rounds begin on Feb. 15. Quarterfinal matches are Feb. 16, the semifinals on Feb. 18 and the gold-medal match is Feb. 19 at 11:10 p.m. on USA Network.

In a life full of hockey adventures, representing the U.S. in the Olympic Games is not something Miele ever really expected.

“It’s amazing,” he said. “I was actually just thinking about how blessed I am to be in this situation at this point in my career, at 33 years old. I never really thought I was going to have a chance to live out a childhood dream of mine. I’m so excited to be here and am trying to take advantage of every moment.”

And an Olympic medal would be hard to top at the Monday night skate.

Town of James Island to request $6.4M in state, federal funds to stem creek contamination

JAMES ISLAND (WCSC) – The Town of James Island will be requesting millions of dollars in state and federal grants to fund a project designed to make a local creek safer to swim.Dave Schaeffer, the James Island Public Service District’s district manager, discussed the grants, which would allow over 200 properties near the creek to switch from septic tanks to water and sewer lines, during a meeting of the James Island Creek Task Force, Thursday afternoon.“Right now, as what we’re seeking, there would not b...

JAMES ISLAND (WCSC) – The Town of James Island will be requesting millions of dollars in state and federal grants to fund a project designed to make a local creek safer to swim.

Dave Schaeffer, the James Island Public Service District’s district manager, discussed the grants, which would allow over 200 properties near the creek to switch from septic tanks to water and sewer lines, during a meeting of the James Island Creek Task Force, Thursday afternoon.

“Right now, as what we’re seeking, there would not be out of pocket tap fees and connection fees, impact fees to the residents,” Schaeffer said.

The town said they will be requesting $6.4 million in federal and state funding to help make the project happen. In addition to the requested money, Schaeffer said the town will commit $1.8 million from American Rescue Plan funds that the town had received.

The James Island Creek Task Force consists of members from the City of Charleston, James Island and Charleston County.

Charleston Waterkeeper Executive Director Andrew Wunderley, who is part of the task force, said the group was formed in 2020 to find ways to clean up the creek and make it safe for swimming.

“Right now, we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to get this right with the American Rescue Act funding that’s coming to the state of South Carolina and is specifically earmarked for projects like this that are tied to public health and are tied to water and sewer upgrades,” Wunderley said.

Fred Schuh has lived alongside the James Island Creek for 20 years. He said he uses the creek regularly with his grandchildren and wants the septic tanks in the area removed to better the community’s health.

“It is concerning,” Schuh said. “Except for people who take an interest in testing it, we would not know there’s anything changed about it, but when there’s scientific studies done to show that there’s a problem, we need to pay attention to it.”

As a possible solution, Schuh also suggested that septic tanks should be inspected more frequently, so property owners could know when to repair their tanks.

However, for now, he said he supports the town requesting the funds to help solve the problem.

“If we could make the public aware of this and ask whatever funds possible be diverted to this extremely useful endeavor, I say I’m all for it,” Schuh said.

Schaeffer said during the meeting that he hopes the project gets funded when the money from the federal government begins being distributed in January or February.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

SC closes on nuns’ James Island waterfront property for $23M with plans to make a park

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.The announcement was ...

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.

In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.

The announcement was a surprise at the time.

State Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, told The Post and Courier in an interview this week that lawmakers only noticed the property was for sale as the window to bid was rapidly closing, and that the state’s formal offer came after that period had ended.

The state’s offer was not the highest, but it was successful, Campsen said, in part because it came without conditions that a developer might attach — like not closing until building permits are awarded.

Property records indicate the sale closed at the end of July, and the final price was $23.25 million.

The opportunity to preserve the 23-acre waterfront parcel from development, complete with views of Fort Sumter and the rest of Charleston Harbor, was a rare one, Campsen said.

He said the sisters “felt like their legacy and their stewardship of that land would be best protected, best preserved for future generations if the state bought it.”

The property will be owned by the Department of Natural Resources, which runs the marine lab next door, and managed by the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, which might one day rent out the convent building on the site.

Campsen said the 24 rooms would probably have to be expanded for future visitors.

Sam Queen, a spokeswoman for PRT, said that a public planning process for the site is expected to begin early next year.

“It definitely is a unique situation and one we’re excited about,” she said.

DNR, meanwhile, had already been doing some work near the site, cooperating with the sisters there to use oyster reefs to stabilize erosion on the waterfront, said Erin Weeks, an agency spokeswoman. Most of the parcel is forested, with a residence building and a chapel on site.

Campsen said he was excited for the planning process to incorporate the existing DNR land, and that the two parcels could be at least partially tied together into one park. It’s a historically significant area — the point at the end of Fort Johnson Road is where the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter.

In the meantime, nothing will change on the land any time soon. As a condition of the sale, the sisters are allowed to stay on the property through at least June 2022, with an option to extend to December 2022.

The nuns were looking to move as their members age and new women don’t join the ranks. Sister Mary Joseph Ritter confirmed that the congregation planned to relocate to the Bishop Gadsden retirement home, but the transition wouldn’t come until next year.

“We’re on the waiting list, just like everybody else,” she said.

The congregation didn’t have any further details on the move, she said, but would have more to say in the coming months about how they hope to preserve their legacy.

Twelve members remain among the Sisters of Charity, a congregation that has ministered in Charleston since 1829. Through its history, the group ran a school for free children of color in the 1840s, cared for both Union and Confederate wounded soldiers during the Civil War, and founded the hospital that would evolve into the Roper-St. Francis health care system.

The sisters moved to their current home on James Island in the 1950s.

Testing points to human source of James Island Creek pollution

JAMES ISLAND — For years, bacteria in a creek that cuts through the middle of this sea island had turned up at alarmingly high levels, spurring parents to warn their kids not to swim there.The testing done by Charleston Waterkeeper helped lead to new water-quality standards from the state that require action o...

JAMES ISLAND — For years, bacteria in a creek that cuts through the middle of this sea island had turned up at alarmingly high levels, spurring parents to warn their kids not to swim there.

The testing done by Charleston Waterkeeper helped lead to new water-quality standards from the state that require action on the impaired stream. Waterkeeper’s testing, conducted since 2013, consistently showed high levels of fecal bacteria.

But only recently did more specialized tests show the source of this bacteria. Waterkeeper collected the samples and the utility Charleston Water System paid $5,000 for them to be analyzed by a lab in Florida. The results showed that the fecal matter primarily had human DNA — with bird DNA from droppings the next most prevalent, and dog DNA from backyards in third place.

“This is important information to help us pinpoint sources,” Andrew Wunderley of Waterkeeper said.

The results have already been incorporated into a watershed plan to clean up the creek. According to that document, one of the most likely sources of contamination is septic tanks near the creek. There are 308 in total in two clusters near the water that have been pointed to as the most likely culprits.

Septic tanks can fail if placed in soils that don’t drain well or soil that drains too quickly, letting effluent flow faster than organisms in the soil break it down. Rising water tables can also lead to contamination by limiting the amount of soil the effluent flows through.

Now, members of a task force to clean up the creek are looking at ways to extend piped sewer service so problematic septic systems are eliminated. Most of these are expected to be in the town of James Island, which is served by James Island Public Service District, though some may be in the city of Charleston and Charleston County.

All told, replacing the problem septic tanks throughout the watershed is estimated to cost $8.2 million.

State Sen. Sandy Senn, R-Charleston, and state Rep. Spencer Wetmore, D-Folly Beach, both said they are working to find funds at the state level for the project. COVID-19 relief funds, which have been earmarked for water and sewer work, might provide some of the funding. The state’s environmental regulator also has grant programs for water-cleanup projects.

Meanwhile, the town of James Island has already set aside $1.8 million of its American Recovery Plan funds toward the effort.

“If the state money doesn’t materialize or if it materializes in a limited fashion, we will look at where the most serious problem is” and extend sewer there first, James Island Mayor Bill Woolsey said.

Woolsey said the town is making its own moves to identify problem septic systems, passing an ordinance that requires inspection every three years while working on another town-paid effort to inspect every septic tank in the creek’s watershed in the coming months.

Charleston County has also been conducting more testing of the creek since June and plans to take and analyze monthly samples until bacteria levels are under control, spokeswoman Taylor Green said.

The bacteria discharges to the creek need to be reduced by 98 percent to meet the new water-quality standard, Wunderley said.

James Island hang out spot temporarily closed after citations

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The Barrel on Folly Road is a mostly open-air space that often hosts live music, events, food trucks, and guests and their dogs.The city of Charleston’s Director of Livability and Tourism Dan Riccio says in June the city started receiving complaints and concerns from nearby residents about guests of The Barrel parking in their neighborhood and along the roads.He says city officials inspected the business and issued two citations on June 25. One was from the Fire Marshal for over occupancy and t...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The Barrel on Folly Road is a mostly open-air space that often hosts live music, events, food trucks, and guests and their dogs.

The city of Charleston’s Director of Livability and Tourism Dan Riccio says in June the city started receiving complaints and concerns from nearby residents about guests of The Barrel parking in their neighborhood and along the roads.

He says city officials inspected the business and issued two citations on June 25. One was from the Fire Marshal for over occupancy and the other from zoning for not meeting parking requirements to accommodate all guests. Riccio says The Barrel’s occupancy exceeded 100 people, with the requirement for the business set at only 49.

Legally right now there’s only 16 parking spaces to accommodate that he says.

Riccio says even though it is an outdoor space they still have an occupancy load. He says they have never been approved for the outdoor area through the zoning department.

Riccio says they are working with the owner and zoning officials to develop a plan to bring the business into compliance with zoning and occupancy requirements and legally accommodate guests.

He says this is a common concern and process they get from the public on a regular basis.

Zach Barrack says he’s been coming to The Barrel for the past few years. He says he usually parks down the road behind The Barrel where no houses are or parks at a friend’s house and walks. He says he’s never had a resident complain to him.

He says he can’t wait for The Barrel to open back up.

“I’m definitely confident in their abilities. They seem to have a good plan in place from what I’ve heard, so I’m definitely confident,” Barrack said. “I mean, there’s no way the city can shut down a place that’s not only a great place for the humans, but a great place for the dogs. And especially with it being open air with COVID and everything going on.”

Riccio says another court hearing will be in two weeks.

Chad Reynolds, the owner of The Barrel, released the following statement:

As far as occupancy goes, I am working to comply with what the City is requiring in order to increase my occupancy. The Certificate of Occupancy from 2013 states that it is only 49, including the yard. I questioned that last part in a meeting with Zoning in late 2019 and was told that they didn’t have the same requirements for outdoor patron use areas back in 2013 when my plans were approved. Regardless, I’ve hired a design professional who is working with me on a plan that will create more parking spaces on my property thus decreasing my yard space, but also increasing my occupancy. We just have to find that balance. But yet I worry that, given how badly my neighbors behind me seemingly want The Barrel gone, I might be fighting an extremely difficult battle as they have linked up with some folks with a lot of pull in our community. I hope this isn’t the case, but it is this fear that is causing me to lose sleep at night.

To the insufficient parking citation, for 6+ years my patrons parked in the right-of-way down Battery Island Dr. and along Folly Road with no issues. At least none that I was made aware of. But a unilateral decision was made many months ago to completely surround my business with 17 No Parking signs. Starting at the Folly Boat and going around the corner pretty far down Battery Island Dr. But rather than fight this action, I am willing to sacrifice valuable yard space in order to hopefully make everyone happy. I hope to have a site plan submitted to the City by Friday.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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