Pressure Washingin Johns Island, SC

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Pressure Washing Johns Island, SC

Johns Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Johns Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Johns Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Johns Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Johns Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Johns Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Johns Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Johns Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Johns Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Johns Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Johns Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Johns Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Johns Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Johns Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Johns Island, we work with business owners across Johns Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Johns Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Johns Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Johns Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Johns Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Johns Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Johns Island residents speaking out after Charleston Co. considers 95-acre land purchase

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – A proposed land purchase on Johns Island is raising concern among some residents.Charleston County is considering buying 95 acres of land along Humbert and Main Roads for a temporary hurricane debris management site. The Charleston County Public Works Department first brought this proposal to County Council in late January.“I think right now the folks on Johns Island are primarily concerned about what impact, if any, this is going to be on their quality of life,” said longtime Johns...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – A proposed land purchase on Johns Island is raising concern among some residents.

Charleston County is considering buying 95 acres of land along Humbert and Main Roads for a temporary hurricane debris management site. The Charleston County Public Works Department first brought this proposal to County Council in late January.

“I think right now the folks on Johns Island are primarily concerned about what impact, if any, this is going to be on their quality of life,” said longtime Johns Island resident Joe Boykin.

Public works officials said they were hoping to explore a number of uses for the land, including using it as a site to chip, haul or burn debris, using the curtain burning method. Officials are also looking into the possibility of using the land for a borrow pit site.

Multiple Johns Island residents spoke out against this proposal during the County Council meeting on February 1. Council tabled the decision and will revisit in a month.

“To tell you the truth, I think that our council members, they feel we need to back off of this because we didn’t have a whole lot of information, a lot of input before from the community and now that we are hearing from them, their voice is loud and clear to us,” said Councilwoman Anna Johnson.

Johnson said she was opposed to the purchase when she heard the plans. Johnson told News 2 she is inviting residents to join her at Council Chambers on Wednesday at 5:00 p.m. to discuss this matter.

County Council member Jenny Honeycutt released a statement on the matter. She said in part, “I have confirmed this afternoon (Friday) that burning is no longer being sought as a use for this site.”

Some Johns Island residents are planning to meet in the Berkeley Electric parking lot Saturday at 9:00 a.m. to speak out against the plan.

Officials with the Public Works Department said the land would be a beneficial purchase because it falls under the Asian Longhorned Beetle infestation quarantine area which would allow for processing of vegetative debris that is not allowed to be moved for fear of spreading the insects to new areas.

Boykin said he understands why the County would want to use this land but feels there needs to be more information on the potential impacts.

“We need to know a lot about what this incineration process is all about, what impacts it may have on air quality, water quality, noise. It could potentially impact folks that live nearby,” said Boykin. “I am withholding my position on this until I can learn more of the facts.”

Johns Island welcomes California luxury hotel company

Charleston remains a popular destination, and the city’s expanding luxury hotel scene reflects that trend.California-based Auberge Resorts Collection plans to debut its first planned luxury hotel in South Carolina come 2024 in the form of The Dunlin, located within the Kiawah River master-planned community on Johns Island.In partnership with real estate developer ...

Charleston remains a popular destination, and the city’s expanding luxury hotel scene reflects that trend.

California-based Auberge Resorts Collection plans to debut its first planned luxury hotel in South Carolina come 2024 in the form of The Dunlin, located within the Kiawah River master-planned community on Johns Island.

In partnership with real estate developer The Beach Co. and private investment and management company McNair Interests, the project is set to have a January groundbreaking.

“The Dunlin will offer an unforgettable escape where guests can immerse themselves in the pristine natural setting of Johns Island and the culturally rich attractions of Charleston,” Auberge Chairman Dan Friedkin said in a statement.

The Dunlin property will include 72 cottage-style guest rooms and suites and 19 villas, as well as a main lodge and porch, great rooms and a library lounge. Amenities encompass a pool with cabanas, full-service spa, community farmstead, and access to the community’s Spring House riverfront swim and fitness facilities.

A riverfront restaurant with outdoor deck will also be available, as will two event spaces, including a 10,000-square-foot indoor-outdoor event hall.

“We are pleased to partner with Auberge Resorts Collection to create The Dunlin, which will be one of the most remarkable new resorts in the country,” Beach Co. CEO John Darby said. “Auberge has a terrific track record of creating the most unique hospitality experiences in the world, and this endeavor’s intimate setting will bring highly personalized service with a coastal experience inspired by the local environment.”

Built into the Kiawah River community, which puts emphasis in natural surrounding elements, The Dunlin will consist of 2,000 acres of land with 20 miles of riverfront nature trails and marshlands. Guests will be able to participate in nature excursions on the property, including fly fishing, crabbing and boating, as well as paddle boarding, hiking and biking.

Architect Robert Glazier was chosen to design the resort, and Amanda Lindroth of Lindroth Design will lead the interior design of the property.

Construction financing was provided by United Bank’s Charleston offices.

Auberge Resorts Collection has 22 other hotels and resorts across the globe, recently winning accolades from Travel & Leisure’s 2021 World’s Best and Conde Nast’s 2021 Readers’ Choice awards.

Johns Island neighbors are organizing against potential hurricane debris burn site

JOHNS ISLAND — As Charleston County decides whether to buy 95 acres on this sea island to manage hurricane wreckage, nearby residents are speaking out against the move.Several people showed up to the Feb. 1 County Council meeting, urging the panel not to allow burning and dirt mining on the parcels. They cited concerns about air quality from smoke and trucks running up and down Johns Island’s already clogged roads. Some have organized a planned meeting for concerned neighbors on Feb. 5, when they will convene to discuss th...

JOHNS ISLAND — As Charleston County decides whether to buy 95 acres on this sea island to manage hurricane wreckage, nearby residents are speaking out against the move.

Several people showed up to the Feb. 1 County Council meeting, urging the panel not to allow burning and dirt mining on the parcels. They cited concerns about air quality from smoke and trucks running up and down Johns Island’s already clogged roads. Some have organized a planned meeting for concerned neighbors on Feb. 5, when they will convene to discuss the matter further.

“It just feels like another punch in the gut as a Johns Island resident, to be honest with you,” Becca Nexsen, who lives near the site, told The Post and Courier. “We have unbridled development, there’s so little infrastructure … we’re Charleston County’s dumping ground. Of course we’re going to get this.”

The proposal to buy three tracts of farmland between Humbert Road and Main Road, known locally as Grayson Oaks, first came before County Council in a committee meeting in late January. Eric Adams, the county’s deputy director for public works, told The Post and Courier the site could be used to burn fallen tree limbs and vegetation after a major storm, to turn this material into wood chips, or as a possible dirt mine.

One of the reasons the land is attractive to the county is because of an infestation of invasive Asian longhorned beetles. A large swath of southern Charleston County is inside a beetle quarantine area, and wood cannot legally be removed without being processed or shredded into small pieces first. The Grayson Oaks land is inside that boundary, and thus, could handle debris inside of it too.

But Ted Cadmus, who lives in the Gift Plantation neighborhood less than a mile away, said the smoke would be a nuisance to local property values, and that additional trucks to and from the site would stress already-packed roads.

“I kind of don’t care if it is infrequent or frequent as far as the burning is concerned,” Cadmus said. Even if the county uses special burning methods to lessen smoke, he said, “the same pollutants are going to be thrown off.”

Cadmus also worried about ash from the fire polluting groundwater, and thus, wells in the area around it. One of the speakers at the County Council meeting also said he and others off Humbert Road use well water and could be affected.

Patricia Fair, a researcher who has spent decades studying environmental contamination, spoke at the council meeting and wrote them a letter describing the potential health effects of wood smoke. Fair, who also lives in Gift Plantation and works as adjunct faculty for the Medical University of South Carolina, wrote that the fine particulate matter in smoke, or soot, can cause a bevy of health effects.

“These microscopic particles can get into your eyes and respiratory system, where they may cause burning eyes, runny nose, and illnesses, such as bronchitis,” Fair wrote. “Fine particles can make asthma symptoms worse and trigger asthma attacks. Fine particles can also trigger heart attacks, stroke, irregular heart rhythms, and heart failure, especially in people who are already at risk for these conditions.”

Council members appeared split on the issue at their Feb. 1 meeting, with some expressing concern over potential nuisances from the site, and others saying that this kind of hurricane cleanup work was simply not optional and needed a reliable location.

“If there’s a valid need and there’s property, we’ve got to try and figure out a way to make it work,” Councilman Brantley Moody said. “We’ve got to find places to do this (type of work) that are other than just stick it in North Charleston.”

But Councilwoman Anna Johnson, who represents Johns Island, said the additional traffic strain on Main Road wouldn’t work, and the St. Johns Fire District is already stretched thin by residents’ reports of smoke from rural burning elsewhere on the island.

She questioned whether the county is considering the land “because it’s available to be purchased, or because we need some place to burn, or we need a (dirt) pit?”

Ultimately, County Council tabled the issue for a month.

But residents will continue to organize in the meantime. A meeting has been set for 9 a.m. on Feb. 5, in the parking lot of Berkeley Electric Cooperative at 1135 Main Road.

Johns Island residents concerned about possible medical village

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Johns Island residents have concerns about a proposed Medical Village on Betsy Kerrison Parkway.Plans were presented at a Charleston County workshop last week, but no formal plans have been submitted to planning yet.The conceptual planned Island Park Place Medical Health and Wellness Village is proposed to be built along Betsy Kerrison Parkway, right across from Rosebank Farms.Plan from DesignWorks show it intends to offer a village-like setting with healthcare and wellness services.The...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Johns Island residents have concerns about a proposed Medical Village on Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

Plans were presented at a Charleston County workshop last week, but no formal plans have been submitted to planning yet.

The conceptual planned Island Park Place Medical Health and Wellness Village is proposed to be built along Betsy Kerrison Parkway, right across from Rosebank Farms.

Plan from DesignWorks show it intends to offer a village-like setting with healthcare and wellness services.

The conceptual plans for the Island Park Place show a 40,000-square-foot Main Medical Facility along with other practices throughout the village like physical therapy, pain management, women’s wellness, chiropractic’s, orthopedics, dentistry, family medicine, cardiology, nutrition, life fitness, pharmacy, health grocery and eateries.

James Stanton lives a few miles from the proposed location. He says he’s in favor of having more medical facilities in this area of Johns Island, but has concerns about the exact site.

“Myself, many of our neighbors, we’re very pro-development and understand where the infrastructure needs to be improved,” Stanton said. “We just want it to be done in a smart way.”

Other people like Rich Thomas, who lives right across from the potential medical village, are worried the medical village would change the character of Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

He feels areas like Freshfield Village or Maybank Highway would be better suited for this type of development.

“Part of the road, about half of it, directly across the road from here is swampy, wetlands,” Thomas said. “So that land would have to be filled in to build a proposed development. Doing that would cause the run-off to go around and back across my property actually if you look at the flow path.”

The workshop meeting last week was the first step for the developer to introduce the planned development.

However, in order for it to ever come, the site would first need to be rezoned to a planned development (PD) through Charleston County Zoning and Planning. The current zoning of the property does not allow the proposed use.

As of now, Charleston County Zoning and Planning Department says they do not have a formal application. Therefore, it is not currently scheduled for any upcoming Planning Commission meetings.

“There’s a feeling around here at times that things just get done in the dead of night,” Thomas said.

He says he hopes there’s a strong public/private conversation if this medical village moves forward in the future.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

New taxing district aims to boost Johns Island infrastructure funds

On Johns Island, longtime residents’ complicated relationship with change is nothing new.Devonne Hammond, manager of Fields Farm Market on River Road, said growth on the historically rural island feels inevitable. Hammond grew up on his family’s 40-acre farm and moved away for college but eventually found his way back to an island that looked different than the one of his youth.“I don’t know if I can reasonably think of any place where growth doesn’t mean change for some people,” Hammond said...

On Johns Island, longtime residents’ complicated relationship with change is nothing new.

Devonne Hammond, manager of Fields Farm Market on River Road, said growth on the historically rural island feels inevitable. Hammond grew up on his family’s 40-acre farm and moved away for college but eventually found his way back to an island that looked different than the one of his youth.

“I don’t know if I can reasonably think of any place where growth doesn’t mean change for some people,” Hammond said. “I just hope it doesn’t have as much of a negative impact on our residents as we might expect.”

The farm has been in his family since Reconstruction, when formerly enslaved laborers took over former plantations on Johns Island.

“Its not until you move away that you see everything people go through to attain what my family already has,” Hammond said.

From 2010 to 2020, census data shows the island’s population within Charleston city limits doubled from nearly 5,300 residents to almost 12,000.

A new taxing district established by the city of Charleston aims to use funding from the island’s commercial and residential growth to help ease its growing pains like lagging road and drainage infrastructure.

The district, approved by City Council Oct. 12, places a tax on new development on the part of the island that falls within Charleston city limits to help fund municipal projects. It doesn’t apply to any existing developments or developments that were in the permitting process at the time of the council vote.

“Folks view development on the island as coming before the infrastructure,” said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force. The task force was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

At one point, City Council considered a six-month moratorium on new housing on Johns Island proposed by Mayor John Tecklenburg. He advocated for the proposal as a way for the city to catch up on long-needed infrastructure improvements. After a mixed response, the 2018 proposal failed.

Over its 30-year lifespan, the newly approved taxing district, known as a Municipal Improvement District or MID, is projected to generate $60 million of additional revenue specifically for Johns Island, consultants hired by the city estimate. Developers will pay $480 per year per new apartment unit or single-family home. New individual single-family homes that are not part of subdivision will only be subject to the $480 per year tax if they are on properties over 2-acres. New commercial business owners will pay an equivalent tax based on the size of the property. A 10,000-square-foot commercial space would pay about $2,600 per year, city planning department officials estimate. The tax will increase by 2 percent each year.

As a lifelong resident of the island and new business owner, Estuary Beans & Barley brewery owner Scott Harrison said he is concerned about the potential burden the MID may place on new businesses. His brewery on Meek’s Farm Road is located on the same lot as the new Charleston Distilling, which relocated from King Street in November.

“It takes a long time to open up a business here and it takes a long time to get the approvals,” he said. “I am sure things at the city are backed up, but especially with COVID-19, time is important.”

Harrison opened his brewery in 2020, so he won’t be subject to the new tax, but he wants the city to encourage new development as long as it respects the island’s agricultural roots.

“We have a farm-to-table kind of feel out here that Johns Island has always been known for,” he said. “On the one hand, I would hate to see the farms go away, but it would be nice if city planning helped growth happen the way it does in the rest of Charleston.”

Charleston County’s Urban Growth Boundary limits dense development on much of the island outside of Charleston city limits, which has helped preserve farmland in the area.

Zlogar, the Johns Island task force chair, said he could see the MID benefiting efforts to balance urban development and rural preservation. With new funding sources, the city could buy land for park space or conservation areas to create a buffer between the urban growth boundary and the rest of the island where more development will take place.

“It’s all about community, how do you use these funds to bring the community together,” he said.

Along with the Johns Island Task Force, other community groups have endorsed the MID, including the Johns Island Council and the Johns Island Community Association.

Councilman Karl Brady Jr., who represents Charleston’s portion of Johns Island, said he pursued the MID designation because many proposed improvements on the island struggle to receive sufficient funding.

“Improvements are coming, but I’m sure it’s not as fast as some people would like,” Brady said. “This will give us the ability to do some homegrown improvements like the Johns Island Park expansion and road and infrastructure projects.”

Johns Island is the first area of the city to get a MID, mainly because it has the most potential for new development, Charleston Planning Director Robert Summerfield said.

“Johns Island has quite a bit of future development, unlike West Ashley or the peninsula where most of the development will be redevelopment,” he said.

The district will likely not create significant revenue for at least three years, Summerfield said. However, once revenue is generated, the city may be able issue bonds with it to jumpstart its use.

Transportation improvements in particular are crucial, said Michael Johnson, president of the Headquarters Island Property Owners Association on Johns Island. Johnson grew up on Johns Island and returned after stints in Houston and New Orleans.

“Charleston has become one of the most unsustainable places I’ve visited in a long time,” he said. “The traffic is horrendous.”

Not all proposed road projects are popular. An ongoing plan to extend Interstate 526 from West Ashley through James and Johns Island is seen by some as a threat to Johns Island’s Gullah-Geechee heritage. That plan is largely funded by the S.C. Department of Transportation and Charleston County and will not likely be impacted by the MID.

Residents of Johns Island are likely years away from seeing improvements funded with MID dollars, but the development will continue.

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