Pressure Washingin Moncks Corner, SC

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Pressure Washing Moncks Corner, SC

Moncks Corner is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Moncks Corner. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Moncks Corner comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Moncks Corner, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Moncks Corner are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Moncks Corner. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Moncks Corner. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Moncks Corner, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Moncks Corner, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Moncks Corner, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Moncks Corner, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Moncks Corner, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Moncks Corner, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Moncks Corner, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Moncks Corner, we work with business owners across Moncks Corner who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Moncks Corner, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Moncks Corner, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Moncks Corner, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Moncks Corner, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Moncks Corner? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Moncks Corner, SC

People concerned about how a Lowcountry cemetery is managed

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. (WCBD) – Severe damage to the Plantation Memorial Gardens cemetery grounds in Moncks Corner left many worried about how their loved ones’ gravesite is being cared for. Now, they’re having trouble getting answers about the work that is being done.“I think it’s the caretakers are not paying attention to what they’...

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. (WCBD) – Severe damage to the Plantation Memorial Gardens cemetery grounds in Moncks Corner left many worried about how their loved ones’ gravesite is being cared for. Now, they’re having trouble getting answers about the work that is being done.

“I think it’s the caretakers are not paying attention to what they’re doing,” said Linda Sutton, who has several relatives buried on the property.

Sutton says the grounds staff is irresponsible.

“They do have problems with hitting the headstones and hitting the benches and breaking them apart,” she said.

Sutton says the damage to the grounds found on Monday was a mistake made by the cemetery.

“My understanding is there were graves being run over,” she said. “Dug up, whatever, but I think that is not quite exactly right. It looks like maybe they had buried somebody and they made a mess with the tractor and they were trying to fix their mess.”

But the damage still concerned her nonetheless.

“As soon as I saw it on the news,” Sutton said. “It was at night and I got in the truck with my husband and came out here and checked because I was that upset over it.”

She says the cemetery grounds aren’t her only concern.

“The mausoleum has water seeping out of the crypts areas,” Sutton said. “There are cracks, it looks like it’s going to collapse and it’s just in bad shape.”

Sutton says her family has filed several complaints that have gone unanswered. Now, they’re not sure where to turn.

“I do believe that there is a major problem here with the mausoleum and the graves sinking,” she said. “I don’t know what they can do to fix it, but I’m like a lot of people, I have a lot of spots out here and there’s nothing I can do about it.”

News 2 has reached out to Plantation Memorial Gardens but have yet to hear back at this time.

Laundry trailer to provide clean clothes to area homeless

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. (WCBD) – A new tool is helping homeless individuals in Berkeley County.Jean’s Angels, a local nonprofit, was established in 2014 to help people across the Lowcountry. Now, a new laundry trailer is helping those in need wash and dry their clothes.Katrina Carpenter, who founded the nonprofit, said she named it after her mother.“I started Jeans Angels because I lost my mom due to ovarian cancer; it was a very difficult time for me. Right after that I went through a divorce, then my sist...

MONCKS CORNER, S.C. (WCBD) – A new tool is helping homeless individuals in Berkeley County.

Jean’s Angels, a local nonprofit, was established in 2014 to help people across the Lowcountry. Now, a new laundry trailer is helping those in need wash and dry their clothes.

Katrina Carpenter, who founded the nonprofit, said she named it after her mother.

“I started Jeans Angels because I lost my mom due to ovarian cancer; it was a very difficult time for me. Right after that I went through a divorce, then my sister had brain surgery.”

Initially, she started helping children whose parents have a terminal illness. They also had an outreach to senior citizens. After the death of her brother, who used to help the homeless because he was once homeless, the group started giving the homeless new clothes and shoes.

“They still didn’t feel a part of the community, a part of society, even though we’re giving them new clothes in it because the clothes sometimes are dirty,” she said. “I started thinking and God just laid it on my heart, and he said we need to do more.”

So, the idea of this laundry trailer was created.

“It has four washers in, it four dryers and it’s mobile so we’re able to go around.”

They also plan to stop by churches on occasion to help people in that area, homeless or not, who may not have access to laundry facilities. And Moncks Corner is going to let them be at their weekly farmer’s market.

“We are currently working on our second trailer that has three shower units and has a station for barbers to cut hair as well as a kitchen to provide hot meals.”

Katrina believes the trailers can also be used to help anyone in need, homeless or not, during disasters.

“Making a difference in someone’s life heals me from the hurt of losing my mom, my dad, my siblings. So, a lot of people say, ‘hey do you have nine children? why do you devote so much time to this?’ This is healing for me. Someone needs to do it. There’s so many people out here there who just need someone to encourage them.”

Katrina said they’re hoping to have their mobile shower unit available by this summer.

Goose Creek to break ground on new $9 million park

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek will be breaking ground on a new 13-acre park next month, and officials say it will have something for everyone.The new park is called Central Creek Park, and it will cost $9 million to build. The city will soon be breaking ground on a piece of land off Old Moncks Corner Road, near St. James Avenue, to build Central Creek Park.Recreation Director Crystal Reed said the park will cater to everyone.“The focus of this park is it’s going to be inclusive,” Re...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of Goose Creek will be breaking ground on a new 13-acre park next month, and officials say it will have something for everyone.

The new park is called Central Creek Park, and it will cost $9 million to build. The city will soon be breaking ground on a piece of land off Old Moncks Corner Road, near St. James Avenue, to build Central Creek Park.

Recreation Director Crystal Reed said the park will cater to everyone.

“The focus of this park is it’s going to be inclusive,” Reed said. “We’re on a wellness mission, and inclusivity is our top priority.”

The park will be funded by just over $4 million in coronavirus relief money, $1.5 million from the city’s general fund and just under $3.5 million from hospitality taxes.

Reed said with that money, the park will be loaded with features.

“We’ll have a sand volleyball court, basketball court,” she said. “It will have a greenspace with a stage with a food truck area, so that people can have social gatherings.”

Other features in the park include pickleball courts, a pavilion that will host events and an all-inclusive playground for kids of all ages and abilities.

Sean June lives in Goose Creek and came out to play basketball with his friends next to where Central Creek Park will be. He said he can’t wait for it to be built.

“I was actually kind of shocked because I was talking to my friends,” he said. “I thought they were going to put apartments over there, but it will be a nice addition to the community.”

June also said he plans on using the basketball courts and the food truck area once the park eventually opens.

“Every weekend, there’s always a bunch of people behind playing basketball,” he said. “I’m pretty sure it’s a big staple in our community to have parks.”

Reed said the city’s focus on building parks, such as the recently opened John McCants Veterans Park, is to make sure people can get together outdoors.

“It’s really just a focus on creating community,” Reed said. “That’s why we’re doing it. We want people to have activities and places to go in their city where they don’t have to leave the city limits of Goose Creek.”

Officials said the groundbreaking is scheduled for March 31. That’s when they will reveal how this park will take shape.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Commentary: We protected the Cooper River corridor before. We can do it again.

Since 1949, the monks of Mepkin Abbey have lived a quiet life of agricultural work, study and prayer on the banks of the Cooper River in Berkeley County, surrounded by a vast, historic landscape. Our connection to the earth is a key factor in the spiritual tradition of monastic life. The natural beauty and serenity of the monastery and its surroundings also make Mepkin Abbey an important site for the reflection and spiritual refreshment of visitors from near and far. For many reasons, our brotherhood is bound to the land.In 1997, Mepk...

Since 1949, the monks of Mepkin Abbey have lived a quiet life of agricultural work, study and prayer on the banks of the Cooper River in Berkeley County, surrounded by a vast, historic landscape. Our connection to the earth is a key factor in the spiritual tradition of monastic life. The natural beauty and serenity of the monastery and its surroundings also make Mepkin Abbey an important site for the reflection and spiritual refreshment of visitors from near and far. For many reasons, our brotherhood is bound to the land.

In 1997, Mepkin Abbey was threatened by a plan to build Interstate 73 through the property. This project would have ended our legacy at the abbey and fundamentally changed the entire Cooper River corridor forever. This threat forced us to reconsider our relationship to the land, and the land’s relationship to the community at large. Led by Father Francis Kline at the time, we opposed the planned path of Interstate 73 along with many others, and the highway was ultimately rerouted.

In this way, Mepkin Abbey’s dedication to protecting the Cooper River corridor was born.

Today, on the eastern end of the corridor, suburban developments are popping up along S.C. Highway 41, impacting the culture and character of the Huger community and encroaching on the Francis Marion National Forest. On the western end of the corridor, closer to Moncks Corner, a property owner has recently requested a rezoning of 200 acres bordering the national forest that would open the door to more suburban development. Berkeley County Planning Commission and the land use committee of County Council have both recommended approvals.

The Cooper River corridor is a candle burning from both ends. How do we put out the flames before the whole thing disappears?

In 1997, in response to Interstate 73 and other threats to the corridor, a number of local landowners, conservationists and advocates — including Mepkin Abbey — organized the Cooper River Forum. This group spearheaded efforts to protect the historical and ecological resources of the corridor from incompatible development, including helping to protect properties such as Bonneau Ferry, which provides additional public access to nature.

The monks of Mepkin Abbey took part in these efforts because we believe that serving as good stewards of the land is a fundamental aspect of our tradition. In fact, to help secure the purchase of Bonneau Ferry by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, the monks provided a conservation easement on Mepkin Abbey, including more than 3,000 acres of land and 3 miles of river frontage and ricefields.

For more than two decades, we have all benefitted from the hard work and collaboration of the Cooper River Forum and its many partners. Now, in the face of new threats, it’s time to honor that legacy and launch another effort to save this special place.

Once again, it will require all of us: monks, landowners, conservationists, history buffs, outdoor enthusiasts, advocates and public officials. Once again, it will require commitment and determination. Together, we can make a positive impact on the future of the Cooper River corridor. After all, we’ve done it here before.

Father Joseph Tedesco is the fifth leader of Mepkin Abbey.

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New Moncks Corner project part of first phase of Liberty Trail in South Carolina

MONCKS CORNER — Here, nestled among the trees near the headwaters of the Cooper River, the British army settled in for the long haul.The siege of Charleston was underway, and Loyalist forces during the spring of 1780 wanted a staging ground north of the city where they could regroup, strategize, care for the wounded, deploy troops and, if necessary, seek a secure retreat.Fair Lawn Plantation was perfect. It was a huge property owned by Peter Colleton, eldest son of John Colleton, one the original Lord Proprietors of the C...

MONCKS CORNER — Here, nestled among the trees near the headwaters of the Cooper River, the British army settled in for the long haul.

The siege of Charleston was underway, and Loyalist forces during the spring of 1780 wanted a staging ground north of the city where they could regroup, strategize, care for the wounded, deploy troops and, if necessary, seek a secure retreat.

Fair Lawn Plantation was perfect. It was a huge property owned by Peter Colleton, eldest son of John Colleton, one the original Lord Proprietors of the Carolina colony and a British sympathizer. The grand residence was fortified and a square earthen redoubt was constructed with the river on one side and an important crossroads on the other.

Fort Fair Lawn would guard Colleton Castle, which had been converted into a hospital and armory. It would protect British troop maneuvers and communication lines, and it would keep rebel Patriots at bay along Congaree Road and a coastal road. It would also assist with the siege, providing the British with a stronghold about 30 miles north of Charleston.

Today, the fort, likely constructed by enslaved people and low-ranking British functionaries, is remarkably intact and protected in perpetuity thanks to a years-long effort by the Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust. It will become part of a new public heritage site featuring nearly 2 miles of new trails, a pavilion, historic interpretation and access to Old Santee Canal Park and the Berkeley County Museum.

More than 30 forts were constructed during the American Revolutionary War in South Carolina. Only two remain in their original condition: the Ninety Six National Historic Site in Greenwood County and Fort Fair Lawn.

The site is one of five to be developed during the first phase of The Liberty Trail, a project spearheaded by the American Battlefield Trust with key support from the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust, an independent affiliate.

“We’re eager to get residents and visitors onsite to experience the history that shaped our nation’s independence,” Doug Bostick, executive director of the Battleground Preservation Trust, said in a statement.

The Liberty Trail eventually will connect and interpret 30 sites in South Carolina, from Charleston to Eutaw Springs to Hanging Rock and Waxhaws and beyond.

Fort Fair Lawn is part of a cluster of important Revolutionary War-era sites in Berkeley County that includes the former Mepkin Plantation (now an abbey), the Avenue of Cedars, Wadboo Bridge, the void that once was Colleton mansion and the ruins of Biggin Church.

Time and money

It took years, as it often does, to secure the land.

The Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust, which will turn 30 in 2022, is one of several land trusts active in the Lowcountry that, together, have protected 1 million acres of private holdings in South Carolina, about 5 percent of the entire state.

The Lord Berkeley Trust’s specific contribution, so far, is 41,000 acres, according to Executive Director Chris Vaughn. It has 10,000 more acres in the pipeline.

Land trusts typically negotiate with property owners who either transfer the deed as a result of a donation, or who agree to a conservation easement — a legally binding contract that forbids certain uses in perpetuity, including real estate development.

Conservation easements became the tool of choice in the 1990s when several environmental groups worked to protect the ACE Basin. That project has served as a model ever since.

The Lord Berkeley Trust set the gears turning to acquire the 80-acre Fort Fair Lawn tract in 2007 and obtained it, finally, in 2016. The surrounding area had been slated for a housing development, but those plans fell through, according to the trust’s former director, Raleigh West.

It took $1 million in funding from the South Carolina Conservation Bank, $500,000 in hydrology mitigation funding from the State Ports Authority, and $500,000 from the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program.

This is the first of its properties the trust will open to the public.

At first, the fort is difficult to discern among the verdant foliage. One steps across a tiny bridge that spans what appears to be a creek. It’s not a creek. It’s part of the moat that was 9 feet high, with 6 feet of water (enough to cover the heads of anyone who fell in).

Inside, careful to avoid snakes and nesting wasps, one can ascend a small mound — the remains of a cannon terreplein.

In the center of the fort are some loose bricks that once were part of a kiln the British used to forge weapons and ammunition. From this location the fort’s earthen walls, now eroded and overgrown mounds, are easier to see.

Beat the retreat

Fort Fair Lawn was manned by garrisons ordered to protect British interests, and to make it easier to move troops, said David Reuwer, who called it a key crossroads, a sort of “Union Station.”

It was a base from which the British lay siege on Charleston, and the place to which the British retreated after the bloody Battle of Eutaw Springs in September 1781, the last big confrontation of the Revolutionary War in the Carolinas.

By then, the British had been worn down by the guerrilla tactics of Brig. Gen. Francis Marion and other Patriots. To maintain their occupation of Charleston, the British resorted to launching raids in the countryside to forage for supplies, food and other useful materials. But the Americans often scuttled their efforts, or worse.

The occupation proved unsustainable, largely because of these constant skirmishes and battles.

The Fair Lawn staging ground was the British base during the Battle of Moncks Corner on April 14, 1780. Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton and his Loyalist fighters defeated S.C. Brig. Gen. Isaac Huger, consolidating British command over the area.

In the weeks following the Eutaw Springs confrontation, when British troops were recovering at Fair Lawn, Marion and Lt. Col. Henry “Light-Horse Harry” Lee, and Col. Wade Hampton harassed the post. On Nov. 17, 1781, Marion dispatched Col. Hezekiah Maham and Col. Isaac Shelby, each with around 200 men, to attack Fair Lawn.

The British, taken by surprise, did not resist as the Patriots took possession of weapons, supplies and about 150 prisoners. When the British evacuated later that month, they burned the buildings on the property.

Wadboo Swamp, Aug. 29, 1782, very near Fair Lawn, was the location of the last of the fighting in Berkeley County. On Dec. 14 that year, after 32 months of occupation, the British evacuated Charleston, and the war in the South drew to a close.

New houses soon will be constructed on a large tract near Fort Fair Lawn. Once they’re built, the fort, its trails and the Old Santee Canal Park will be largely surrounded.

But it could have been worse, with homes butting up against the fort and preventing its linkage to the park. Now, thanks to the efforts of the Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust and its several partners, future visitors to the site can admire the tactics and ingenuity of 18th century warfare and contemplate South Carolina’s contributions to the birth of the nation.

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