Pressure Washingin Ridgeville, SC

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Pressure Washing Ridgeville, SC

Ridgeville is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Ridgeville. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Ridgeville comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Ridgeville, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Ridgeville are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Ridgeville. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Ridgeville. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Ridgeville, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Ridgeville, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Ridgeville, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Ridgeville, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Ridgeville, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Ridgeville, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Ridgeville, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Ridgeville, we work with business owners across Ridgeville who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Ridgeville, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Ridgeville, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Ridgeville, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Ridgeville, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Ridgeville? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Ridgeville, SC

Ridgeville residents in historically Black neighborhood push back against development

RIDGEVILLE — There are two ways that families spell the last name Coburn. There’s “Coburn” as in Coburn Town Road and there’s also “Cobin.”Ethel Cooke, a lifelong resident in the predominately Black community, said her parents told her the mix-up probably comes from some of the neighborhood’s ancestors who were sharecroppers.“They couldn’t read or write,” she said.So the name was spelled on records however it ended up being pronounced.As Cooke sits,...

RIDGEVILLE — There are two ways that families spell the last name Coburn. There’s “Coburn” as in Coburn Town Road and there’s also “Cobin.”

Ethel Cooke, a lifelong resident in the predominately Black community, said her parents told her the mix-up probably comes from some of the neighborhood’s ancestors who were sharecroppers.

“They couldn’t read or write,” she said.

So the name was spelled on records however it ended up being pronounced.

As Cooke sits, telling stories about the community of Coburn Town, the one about the names makes her and others smile. It’s part of what makes this place special — the shared history — and a symbol of what could be lost as growth starts to transform the area.

“We don’t know what’s coming,” said Elizabeth Crum Huffman, another lifelong resident.

Located off School Street, the Coburn Town community is surrounded by trees, open fields, a railroad track and a closed sawmill. Many of the original Black residents saved money and purchased land in the area following the end of slavery.

Nearly 180 acres surrounding the community were recently approved for rezoning by Dorchester County Council. Those rezoned parcels, including the old Ashley River Lumber Co., will now fall under what the county refers to as commercial light-industrial.

Officials expect it likely will soon hold a warehouse, but no development plans have been approved.

It’s one piece of a larger list of changes that highlights Ridgeville as an area of growth. Other indicators include new housing developments, road projects and industrial spaces like the Walmart Distribution Center.

But with a question mark around its future, community members are reflecting even more on what the quiet and familiar community means to them and what it meant to their ancestors who purchased the land to have something of their own.

‘We came up the hard way’

Though it’s been years since farming was the main source of income in the community, it’s still possible to see some of its agricultural roots.

There are open fields that sit on the edges and the rusted fences that used to hold livestock.

Take away the paved roads and some of the home renovations. Picture in its place a couple of wagons, tobacco and potato fields and mules, and it’s easy to imagine what the place looked like when Black residents first poured into it.

Walking down Coburn Town Road, Huffman and her sister Virginia Crum said they can remember having to do farming chores as children and just tossing all of the seeds in the field without any order.

Harvest time would usually give them away, they said laughing.

Their father, Willie Kizer Crum Sr., and mother, Hermena Robinson Crum, had 10 children: seven girls and three boys. The couple married in the 1940s. Willie’s father was a sharecropper.

Virginia Crum, a retired educator, said their father bought the land they live on now. Some of the things she remembers the most about him is he didn’t like buying things on credit and always paid in cash.

Down the street lives James Wesley Duggins Jr., a 78-year-old man who grew up in Coburn Town.

Standing outside working in his yard, he laughed about how annoying the nearby railroad can be with the sound of trains coming through.

His father, James Wesley Duggins Sr., helped build the railroad tracks. “Look now, the machines do all that,” Duggins said.

His family moved to the area around the 1920s.

While talking with the sisters, he reminded Crum she integrated Ridgeville Elementary when she was in the first grade. She was born in 1959.

“There’s so much history,” Crum said.

And while there are tons of happy memories, like playing baseball around some of the farm animals and staying over at each others’ houses, the community also remembers how their elders struggled.

There were times as children when they had to run through the woods to avoid White children throwing rocks, Duggins said.

Huffman and Crum’s mother often had to travel as far as Charleston to sell goods because the White residents in Ridgeville at the time severely underpaid them, they said.

“We had some strong Black people in the community,” Crum said.

Cooke remembers being a child and having a White boy spit at her when they were in town one day.

“I said, ‘Daddy, that ain’t right,’ ” Cooke said. Her father, she recalled, encouraged her to let it go for her own safety.

She also remembers sitting outside and working in a yard for a family for whom her grandmother cooked and cleaned. She wasn’t allowed to come inside the home.

After working in the yard, Cooke laughed and said all she got for it was an orange dress. “And it had a hole in it,” she said.

She said she can’t imagine what her grandmother was paid.

“We came up the hard way,” Cooke said.

There was a time when everyone in their community was a Coburn-Cobin. But with different marriages, other names started to appear.

Two of Crum and Huffman’s aunts married into the Coburn-Cobin family. One of the aunts married Cooke’s grandfather.

Outside of marriages, they said, the community has always felt like one big family that supported each other.

When Cooke’s family was struggling when she was raised, she said, Huffman and Crum’s father would routinely give them potatoes to help them get by.

No one really knew or talked about it.

“Now you borrow sugar and the whole city would know it,” Cooke said.

A growing town

On Nov. 1, as 180 acres surrounding Coburn Town was rezoned to commercial-light industrial, community members and descendants poured in to raise their concerns.

Many noted the things they wanted to see. Crum emphasized helping the schools and adding facilities like health and community centers. Huffman said she would love to see more sidewalks because she enjoys a daily walk.

Tim Lewis and Felicia Cobin can trace their history in the area as far back as 1829. Rebecca Cobin was buried near the community in the late 1940s. She was born in 1883.

“We really want to look at how we can grow together,” Lewis said. “There’s history here.”

Ridgeville’s growth has been a big topic in the past couple of years. Federal funds around COVID-19 relief will bring $6.8 million in roadway improvements around the Ridgeville Industrial Campus.

At the same campus, a Walmart Distribution Center is slated to bring hundreds of jobs to the area, increasing truck traffic.

The county is also expanding water access. Many Coburn Town residents use wells.

In conjunction with new housing developments, there’s a lot more movement in the Ridgeville area.

Dorchester County Councilman David Chinnis said many things the community wants depend on rooftops. No development plans have been approved around the rezoned property near Coburn Town.

“We don’t know what’s being built there,” Chinnis said.

He encouraged residents to continue their involvement. But whatever comes, he said, the goal would be to protect the community with features like buffers.

The county is also looking to start working on a Ridgeville/Givhans Area Growth Management Plan. The plan has one more layer of council approval to go through before work can start on creating it.

The goal with the plan is to raise awareness about infrastructure concerns and funding. Local community members hope to be a part of the planning process. “Understand that this community is growing,” Chinnis said.

And while a lot of the area community members are still wary, many said they still plan to keep pressing on the council to protect the community.

The unknown

Feelings around growth in Coburn Town are mixed.

Some are nervous with the uncertainty about what’s to come and what it means about preserving their land and history.

“I was able to share that history with my children,” said Taneeka Wright.

Her grandfather, John Henry Pinckney, was a welder and mechanic who lived in Coburn Town. Her grandmother, Ethel Mae Pinkney, was a cook.

She said she enjoyed showing her children around the community and how she grew up. She remembers having to invent games with friends and families because there weren’t a lot of things to play with.

“And I would love to share that history with my grandchildren,” she said.

Others in the community are pessimistic and said they know significant change is inevitable.

“It’s not going to be the same anymore,” said Franklin Pinckney, a lifelong resident and a local high school football star at the old Harley-Ridgeville High School.

All he said he remembers now are the body aches.

“It’s not going to be the same anymore,” he said thinking about the future and the thought of hearing loud trucks and movement in a community that tends to be quiet and slow.

One resident said he doesn’t have any fear.

“I like to try and be real,” said Wendell Coburn, 81.

Coburn manages his dementia and lives with his wife Betty, 71. With his condition, Betty is still able to communicate with him and help him have conversations with people.

Community members said he might struggle with the present but he can still hold conversations about the past.

Wendell built their Coburn Town Road home more than 40 years ago. He was raised by a single mother who had to walk 3 miles to work.

He’s known in the community as being someone who was always willing to lend a helping hand without even being asked. Residents said the influence of his mother and the community is all over him. “They preserved him for me,” Betty said with a laugh.

She married into the community.

To Wendell, community connection and talking with people are important. He describes Corburn Town as a community of caring.

When asked to spell his last name, Wendell makes sure people know it’s with the “urn” and not the “in.”

“If you can’t communicate with people, you’re doing nothing,” he said.

In a 1900 census interview of Ransom Coburn it points to the Coburn-Cobin family origin being in Virginia around the Jamestown area.

The descendants believe they came to South Carolina either for work collecting turpentine or constructing the railroads.

First Look: Polestar’s all-Electric O2 Concept Comes with a Built-in Drone—Because It Can

From the third-floor terrace of a Beverly Hills office building, many things are blue. There is the sky above, the Pacific Ocean to the west and here, astride a platform, an azure car with two-plus-two seating and a fast roofline. “If you compare it to the sky, it’s damn close,” says Maximilian Missoni about the vehicle’s appearance. The 43-year-old Austrian has served as Polestar’s head o...

From the third-floor terrace of a Beverly Hills office building, many things are blue. There is the sky above, the Pacific Ocean to the west and here, astride a platform, an azure car with two-plus-two seating and a fast roofline. “If you compare it to the sky, it’s damn close,” says Maximilian Missoni about the vehicle’s appearance. The 43-year-old Austrian has served as Polestar’s head of design since 2018. The convertible in question is the Polestar O2, a concept car that points the way for the five-year-old EV brand.

I say “points” with a degree of literalness. The crease that curves between the running lights gives the O2 a broad upper palate, and the blacked-out chin spoiler is the lower mandible. Between these two elements is a tongue-like insert of body color. As with the rest of the car, the face reflects sublimated aggression, as if the polecat has eaten the canary. Looking too long produces the same woozy feeling that would come from drinking an Elderflower Frosé cocktail over at the Beverly Hills Hotel.

“It’s nice that you can feel it, that this car has all these amazing sculptural qualities,” Missoni says. Parent company Volvo was never quite able to play in the premium market, but EVs allow new chances, and Polestar can be itself: both sculpturally and technically. “Now we have clearly taken our own path, so nobody would say, ‘OK, that’s a Volvo,’” says Missoni.

Compelling design features abound on the retractable-hardtop O2, from the striking 22-inch wheels and the aluminum body’s deep waist, to the “aeroblade” taillight and the white interior punctuated by yellowish-orange seatbelts. But the godawful 15-inch tablet on the dashboard looks like an afterthought.

One of the standout features, however, may be the unexpected drone that lives in, and launches from, a compartment on the deck. Any why not? How many of us have not longed for a small autonomous aircraft aboard our weekend car? With a tap of the screen, the drone emerges from a hidden hangar behind the rear cowl and takes off from the black guide-rail that extends down the deck. The drone keeps pace at road speeds up to 56 mph, filming the cruise to one’s Malibu beach retreat or other scenic destination from a bird’s-eye perspective. But the O2 must be braked to a stop for the drone to land again and put itself away. The resulting footage can be edited on the dashboard, then shared to social media or just kept for posterity.

Beyond the Buck Rogers effects, the O2 elevates Polestar’s profile from its two production models to date, and takes up dramatic themes from the Polestar Precept—the swoopy, Tesla-fighting concept sedan that will eventually come to production as the Polestar 5, manufactured at the new factory in Ridgeville, S.C.

Polestar says it will launch three models in the next three years; a pair of SUVs are under development, and it isn’t a big stretch to guess the future of the O2. This concept car claims to redefine sports roadsters for the electric age. Whether a possible production version can live up to that hype or not, at least the drone will ensure the concept’s journey is well documented.

Working Wednesdays: New Walmart Import Distribution Center hiring to fill 1300-1500 jobs

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The brand new Walmart Import Distribution Center will open soon in Ridgeville and you can learn more about employment opportunities at the massive facility on Working Wednesdays.The center is bringing more than 1000 local jobs to the area.“We’re probably gonna be more so looking into 1300-1500 jobs that we’ll be hiring to be able to support this facility and all the volume we’ll be pushing out of it, General Manager Jeff Holzbauer said.Imported goods will arrive through t...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The brand new Walmart Import Distribution Center will open soon in Ridgeville and you can learn more about employment opportunities at the massive facility on Working Wednesdays.

The center is bringing more than 1000 local jobs to the area.

“We’re probably gonna be more so looking into 1300-1500 jobs that we’ll be hiring to be able to support this facility and all the volume we’ll be pushing out of it, General Manager Jeff Holzbauer said.

Imported goods will arrive through the South Carolina port, and will be stored and sorted at the Walmart Import Distribution Center for delivery to approximately 850 Walmart and Sam’s Clubs throughout South Carolina and other states in the southeast.

“So we will actually start receiving product Feb. 1 of next year, and start shipping product out April 5,” Holzbauer said.

The main focus now is filling positions for freight handlers. The job pays $18 - $19.35 per hour, depending on the shift. Click here to apply.

“The week of Oct. 11 we will start going after a large number of associates to be able to help us with that receiving of the product.”

Other positions include hourly leads, maintenance technicians, order fillers, unloader/processors, and environmental health and safety associates.

The 3-million-square-foot facility is the equivalent of 52 football fields. Dorchester County Economic Development officials say construction should wrap up by the end of the year. The first shipment of goods should arrive at the center by early February, and distribution is expected to start by early April.

Working Wednesdays is a weekly segment that focuses on employment opportunities. You will learn about companies around the Lowcountry, and the current and future positions they have available. The interview will live stream at 1p.m. on Live 5 Facebook, Live5News.com and Apple, Amazon Fire and Roku tv.

Ann McGill will talk with representatives from the companies to get in depth information about the types of services and products they provide, as well as training, benefits and other information to help you decide if it’s a company you might want to work for.

Once the livestream is finished, it will be shared right here at Live5News.com and on Live 5 Facebook.

If your business would like to share job information through this format, send an email to [email protected] and be sure to put ‘Working Wednesdays’ in the subject line.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Polestar’s Developing Persona Shows in Its New Electric Roadster

Polestar O2 Concept, the brand’s second concept car, builds on Polestar’s Precept designWith the unveiling of the Polestar O2 Concept roadster Wednesday, the new Swedish-based, Chinese-owned electric automaker owned by Volvo Cars and Geely Holding Group, suddenly got a lot more interesting.“Polestar O2 is the hero car for our brand,” said Thomas Ingenlath, Polestar CEO. “It opens the door to our secret chamber of future potential. This is a taste of what we can design and engineer with the talent...

Polestar O2 Concept, the brand’s second concept car, builds on Polestar’s Precept design

With the unveiling of the Polestar O2 Concept roadster Wednesday, the new Swedish-based, Chinese-owned electric automaker owned by Volvo Cars and Geely Holding Group, suddenly got a lot more interesting.

“Polestar O2 is the hero car for our brand,” said Thomas Ingenlath, Polestar CEO. “It opens the door to our secret chamber of future potential. This is a taste of what we can design and engineer with the talent and technology we have in-house.”

The new model employs an aluminum platform that also underpins the Polestar Precept concept, which will become the production Polestar 5 flagship, and with which the O2 Concept shares much of its good looks.

Polestar’s current state of affairs

The concept debuts as the Polestar 1 is discontinued for 2022 after a limited three-year production run. While the gas-electric hybrid GT brought the neophyte brand attention, its Volvo-derived looks and gas engine seemed out of synch with the brand’s newer models, which have their own distinct brand identity as an EV brand, despite its origins as Volvo’s high-performance sub-brand.

That was most clearly seen with the release of the dual motor Polestar 2 in 2020, followed by the Polestar 2 Single Motor last year. Two more crossover SUVs are expected to follow.

The first, the Polestar 3, is scheduled to launch later this year, and will the brand’s first model to be built at a plant in Ridgeville, South Carolina, near Charleston. It will share the assembly line with the Volvo S60 and the next-generation XC90. It will be followed in 2023 by the Polestar 4, a coupe-like BEV expected to take on the likes of the upcoming Porsche Macan EV.

Reaffirming Polestar’s new design language

“Polestar O2 is our vision of a new era for sports cars,” said Maximilian Missoni, Polestar’s Head of Design. “By mixing the joy of open top driving with the purity of electric mobility, it unlocks a new mix of emotions in a car. But as with all our cars, we are about more than just straight-line sprints. It’s when you turn the steering wheel that the true fun begins.”

The Polestar 02’s bonded aluminum platform was developed in-house by Polestar’s R&D team in the United Kingdom and engineered for high strength and light weight. This should enhance its handling, with the company stating the new concept delivers little body roll in corners and good damping, along with linear steering feel. Since this platform is derived from the forthcoming Polestar 5, it promises much for the forthcoming flagship.

But the O2 Concept differs from the 5 with its 2+2 cabin. As with any classic sports car, it possesses a long wheelbase and short overhangs. But don’t be fooled; that long wheelbase was employed for more than its looks. It also allows Polestar to fit the car with a large battery pack.

“This car is a meeting point between technology and art, between precision and sculpture, with a determined but not aggressive stance,” said Missoni.

The inside story

Being a battery-electric vehicle, and the eco-friendly image such a driveline enjoys, it’s little surprise it uses a new thermoplastic throughout its interior. The recycled polyester is used for all the cabin’s soft components, including its foam, knit fiber and laminated elements. Engineers also use high grade aluminum throughout to ease recycling when the vehicle is scrapped.

The O2 Concept’s most unusual feature is its autonomous cinematic drone located behind the rear seats that can follow the car at speeds up to 56 mph.

Its videos can be shared in the O2’s 15-inch touchscreen once the car is parked. While such frivolities are expected in a concept car, it could easily become an option should the O2 Concept enter production.

“We wanted to emphasize the experience you can have with a car like the Polestar O2 in new and unusual ways,” said Missoni. “Integrating an autonomous cinematic drone was something that allowed us to push the boundaries on the innovation front.”

Polestar states that it plans to launch three new cars through 2025, any of which could contain some of the 02 Concept’s features.

Before that occurs, however, look for Polestar to list on the Nasdaq in the first half of 2022 in combination with special purpose acquisition company Gores Guggenheim.

Volvo’s Ridgeville plant to go fully electric

The Swedish car manufacturer Volvo Cars will convert its Ridgeville plant in the US state of South Carolina into an all-electric car production facility. The company says that here, the fully electric cars “of the new generation will be built” before Europe and China.CEO Håkan Samuelsson announced the plant’s ambitions in an interview with Automotive News. The plant, which currently only produces the S60 mid-size sedan, will initially be expanded to include two electric crossovers. As already officiall...

The Swedish car manufacturer Volvo Cars will convert its Ridgeville plant in the US state of South Carolina into an all-electric car production facility. The company says that here, the fully electric cars “of the new generation will be built” before Europe and China.

CEO Håkan Samuelsson announced the plant’s ambitions in an interview with Automotive News. The plant, which currently only produces the S60 mid-size sedan, will initially be expanded to include two electric crossovers. As already officially announced, production of the Polestar 3 electric SUV for the US market is to start there next year. In addition, there will be the battery-electric version of the Volvo XC 90.

This confirms rumours at the beginning of 2020 that the electric XC 90 could be built at the Ridgeville plant. It is not yet official whether the all-electric successor to the Volvo XC60, which was announced a few days ago as part of Volvo Cars’ battery joint venture with Northvolt, could also be produced at the US plant from the end of 2024. Details are expected to follow in due course.

The plant, located northwest of the US city of Charleston, was commissioned three years ago. According to earlier statements by the car manufacturer, about 700 million dollars were invested in the site to build electric cars there in the future. According to Samuelsson, it will now be the “first factory in the world to build our new generation all-electric cars – ahead of Europe and ahead of China”. “Charleston will play a very important role in our electrification strategy,” Samuelsson elaborates. “It is a huge investment that we are making here.”

The battery-electric vehicles, based on the company’s proprietary SPA (Scalable Product Architecture) kit, are expected to feature advanced autonomous driver assistance technology. “We have developed new technology, including a completely new architecture that is all-electric,” Samuelsson said.

The electric cars built at the Ridgeville plant in the future will be primarily for the US market, but Automotive News reports that the plant has the capacity to supply overseas markets if needed. At least as far as the electric XC90 is concerned, the factory will initially be the global production centre. From there, the XC90 BEV will be “exported first to Europe and possibly China”, as Javier Varela, head of industrial operations at Volvo Cars, explained. The intention is not to “build a super hub to export from here”, Varela said. “It’s about having a facility that can supply this market and then help supply other markets with flexibility.”

However, since its launch in autumn 2018, the plant has only reached a fraction of its annual capacity of 150,000 vehicles, according to LMC Automotive. Last year, Volvo built fewer than 26,500 S60 midsize sedans in Ridgeville, according to the report.

Polestar, meanwhile, announced in mid-June that production of the SUV model called Polestar 3 for customers is expected to begin in 2022 at the Ridgeville site in the US. Not much is known about the vehicle yet: The Geely-owned Swedish company does not intend to make full product details public until a later date.

Polestar was founded in 2017 by Volvo Cars and Geely Holding. The fact that Polestar shares a production facility with Volvo Cars underlines the significant industrial and financial synergies resulting from the ownership structure, the Swedish company recently stressed. “Production in the US reduces both delivery times and the environmental impact associated with transporting vehicles around the world. It will even have a positive impact on the price of the Polestar 3,” said Dennis Nobelius, COO at Polestar.

The Polestar 3 represents the debut of a new generation of Volvo Car Group’s electric vehicle architecture, designed from the ground up for full electrification. The model will have autonomous driving capabilities and industry-leading connectivity features based on Google’s Android Automotive OS infotainment system.

Also brand new is the news that Volvo Car Group and Northvolt are to form a 50:50 joint venture to develop and produce sustainable batteries. The duo’s central objective is to build a new battery cell factory in Europe with a potential capacity of up to 50 GWh per year. However, the joint venture wants to start with the implementation of a research and development centre in Sweden, which is to go into operation in 2022.

The aforementioned battery cell factory with up to 50 GWh is scheduled to open in 2026 and employ around 3,000 people. The location has not yet been determined, but it is already clear that the products manufactured there will be specifically tailored to power the next generation of pure electric cars from Volvo and Polestar. According to the partners, the first car with battery cells from the new joint venture will be the electric successor to the Volvo XC60 mentioned above. “With self-developed cells for our electric cars, we can focus on giving Volvo and Polestar customers what they want, like range and short charging times,” said Henrik Green, chief technology officer at Volvo Cars.

With reporting by Domenico Sciurti, Germany.

autonews.com

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