Pressure Washingin Seabrook Island, SC

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Pressure Washing Seabrook Island, SC

Seabrook Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Seabrook Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Seabrook Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Seabrook Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Seabrook Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Seabrook Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Seabrook Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Seabrook Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Seabrook Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Seabrook Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Seabrook Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Seabrook Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Seabrook Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Seabrook Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Seabrook Island, we work with business owners across Seabrook Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Seabrook Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Seabrook Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Seabrook Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Seabrook Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Seabrook Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Tony Romo, 4 past champions return to Charleston for Azalea Invitational golf tournament

Four past champions, 18 current state champions and a former NFL quarterback highlight the approximately 90-player field for the 2022 Azalea Invitational Golf Tournament.Tony Romo, former Dallas Cowboys star and current NFL analyst for CBS, returns to the Country Club of Charleston to compete in a strong field that includes a dozen golfers who last year made it to the quarterfinals of a U.S. Golf Association Championship (Junior, Men’s Amateur or Men’s Mid-Amateur).The tournament is set for March 24-27.Former...

Four past champions, 18 current state champions and a former NFL quarterback highlight the approximately 90-player field for the 2022 Azalea Invitational Golf Tournament.

Tony Romo, former Dallas Cowboys star and current NFL analyst for CBS, returns to the Country Club of Charleston to compete in a strong field that includes a dozen golfers who last year made it to the quarterfinals of a U.S. Golf Association Championship (Junior, Men’s Amateur or Men’s Mid-Amateur).

The tournament is set for March 24-27.

Former Azalea champions who have committed to play are Todd White (2015), Austin Langdale (2013), John Engler (1997) and John Finnin (1983). Abel Gallegos of Argentina will not return to defend his 2021 Azalea title.

Tournament chairman Bert Atkinson said he judges the number of players who made it into USGA quarterfinals in 2021 as a testament to the strength of the field.

“To me, that’s the acid test. You qualify to get into the tournament, and then you qualify again and you win three matches to get to the quarterfinals. A player has played pretty well to get that far,” Atkinson said.

One of the players who won on multiple levels in 2021 is Country Club of Charleston member Christian Sease, who played his high school golf at Wando and then played collegiately at Winthrop. Sease was the S.C. Golf Association’s player of the year for 2021 after winning the S.C. Mid-Amateur and making it to the quarterfinals of the U.S. Mid-Amateur.

Mark Costanza of Morristown, N.J., who finished as the runner-up in the 2021 U.S. Mid-Amateur, also will be participating this year as will four-time U.S. Mid-Amateur winner Nathan Smith of Pittsburgh.

Reigning S.C. Amateur champion Harry Reynolds of Greenville and 2020 winner Jonathan Griz of Hilton Head both are in the Azalea field, along with Nicholas Gross of Downingtown, Pa., who won the 2021 Beth Daniel Junior Azalea by nine shots.

Atkinson said changes that have been made on the Seth Raynor-designed course since 2021 could affect scoring. A greenside bunker on the fourth hole has been enlarged significantly; bunkers now guard almost the entire side of the 11th hole; a large mound blocks a view of the green from the fairway on No. 10; and there has been a reconfiguration of the 13th hole.

Starting times for the first three rounds of the tournament will run from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. off the first tee. The field will be cut to the low 60 and ties for the final round with players starting on both nines between 8:30-10:30 a.m.

Coming up

• March 16: Trident Medical Center Lowcountry Transitions golf tournament to benefit Mental Health Heroes, Dunes West Golf & River Club, $525 per four-player team, visit mhheroes.com/golf.

Aces

Sara Murphy, Feb. 21, Charleston Municipal Golf Course, No. 14, 92 yards, 6 utility. Witness: DeLia Smith.

Walton Rogers, Feb. 21, Legend Oaks Golf Club, No. 11, 205 yards, 5-iron. Witnesses: Brooks Swanson, Robert Wylie, Michael Wolfert.

Ray Dickinson, Feb. 22, Dunes West Golf & River Club, No. 6, 158 yards, 6-iron. Witnesses: Mark Estebo, Forest Ficklin.

Mike Randle, Feb. 22, Dunes West Golf & River Club, No. 6, 149 yards, 8-iron. Witnesses: Jason Wing, Kyle Lonneman, Greg Perry.

Alan Greer, Feb. 26, Crowfield Golf Club, No. 16, 171 yards, 6-iron. Witnesses: Mike Devlin, David Jackson, Denis Stroble.

Alan Linnemann, March 1, Charleston Municipal Golf Course, No. 11, 145 yards, 8-iron. Witnesses: Randy Jackson, Ted Mosay, Zach Mosay.

Ron Moffitt, March 1, Crooked Oaks-Seabrook Island Club, No. 13, 118 yards, 9-iron. Witnesses: Jenn Connell, Mitch Pulwer, Michael Garvey.

David Carter, March 3, Shadowmoss Golf Club, No. 13, 111 yards, 9-iron. Witness: Mike DeLoy.

Rick Bartemeyer, March 4, Rivertowne Country Club, No. 8, 110 yards, 7-iron. Witnesses: George King, Brian McGurk, Greg Carlson.

Deon Knecht, March 5, Coosaw Creek Country Club, No. 3, 121 yards, 9-iron. Witnesses: R.J. Keur, Gregg Steffen.

Tammy Tran, March 6, Plantation Course at Edisto, No. 6, 92 yards, 6-hybrid. Witnesses: T.Minh Tran, David Smith.

A hole-in-one should be reported by the golf course. Please email aces to [email protected] and to [email protected].

What we know and what we don’t know about the Beaufort County jet fighter crash

Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort on Saturday asked anyone with photos or video of the F/A-18D before it crashed to send their name and contact information to [email protected] U.S. Marine Corps fighter jet that crashed Thursday afternoon in northern Beaufort County sparked a 12-acre fire that roared through oak trees surrounding a grave site on former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford’s family prope...

Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort on Saturday asked anyone with photos or video of the F/A-18D before it crashed to send their name and contact information to [email protected].

The U.S. Marine Corps fighter jet that crashed Thursday afternoon in northern Beaufort County sparked a 12-acre fire that roared through oak trees surrounding a grave site on former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford’s family property.

“The plane was completely destroyed,” Sheldon Fire Chief Buddy Jones said.

Marines with Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting were still on scene Friday, a spokesperson said at about 1 p.m.

A cause of the crash is still under investigation.

Meanwhile, the two pilots who safely ejected from the multimillion-dollar F/A-18D Hornet combat jet walked away mostly uninjured. One pilot had a bloody lip, a witness said.

The Marine Corps on Friday still was not releasing the names of the pilots or disclosing information about what forced them to abandon the aircraft.

One resident Thursday said she saw a “great yellow, white flame” shooting out of the back of a jet engine before the crash and resulting explosion.

? The jet crashed on Coosaw Plantation, which is former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford’s family property

? The crash site was near Halfmoon Island, according to the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office and Sarah Sanford Rauch, the former governor’s sister. Halfmoon Island is about 4 miles north of U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort and is close to multiple unincorporated communities like Dale, Lobeco and Seabrook.

? The combat jet went down at about 3:15 p.m. Thursday, according to the Marines.

? Two Marine pilots were able to safely eject from the jet and were in stable condition Thursday, the Marine Corps said. The pilots were “conducting a routine flight.” Rauch, who saw the jet take off from Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, said one pilot had a “really bloody lip” after the crash, but otherwise was fine.

? There were no civilian casualties, Beaufort Air Station spokesperson Capt. Thomas Jones said. Some private property was damaged, Jones said, and the military was working with the owners on that.

? Sanford, the former governor, in a Friday phone call with The Beaufort Gazette and Island Packet said a number of large oak trees surrounding his late father’s grave on Coosaw Plantation were destroyed in the crash.

? Jones, the Sheldon fire chief, said the fighter jet crashed in a wooded area a half-mile from the nearest home. When firefighters arrived, the aircraft was on fire, Jones said. The fire burned “pretty hot” and spread to 12 acres of nearby woods.

The air station’s fire department sent two crash rescue trucks with large foam retardant capacities, and Sheldon had two water tankers on scene. Burton firefighters also responded, and South Carolina Forestry plowed a fire line around the blaze. “When you deal with aircraft like this,” Jones said, “you are dealing with fire from fuel, and you’re dealing with parts everywhere.”

? Rauch, the former governor’s sister, gave this account of the crash Thursday: “We watched this plane take off, and my brother (Bill) made a comment about the afterburner and ... it was like this great yellow, white flame shooting out of the back of one of the engines, and I said, ‘That’s a fire.’ Then all of a sudden, the plane started slowing down and slowing down, and the flames were getting bigger and bigger, and they were, you could tell, kind of reeving to try to stay in the air, and all of a sudden it just slowed down and then it went nose-down ... and I yelled to my brother, ‘No, no, no, no, no, it’s going down.’ (I) watched it roll, and then go nose dive, and then a couple seconds later, it was a colossal explosion.”

? The Marine Corps is investigating the crash, a spokesperson said Friday. The Federal Aviation Administration said “the military will investigate.” A spokesperson for the National Transportation Safety Board said the agency does not investigate military aircraft accidents. “The only exception would be if there were a midair collision involving a non-military aircraft,” the spokesperson wrote in a statement.

? The F/A-18D Hornet military jet that crashed was part of the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, the major East Coast aviation unit of the Marine Corps headquartered at U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, which has fixed-wing aircraft based at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort.

The D model of the F/A-18, produced by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing), first became operational in 1987 and costs $29 million per unit, according to the U.S. Navy. F/A-18Ds are used by the Navy for “attack, tactical air control, forward air control and reconnaissance squadrons,” according to Military.com.

? Maj. Melanie Salinas, a spokesperson for the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, and Capt. Thomas Jones, the spokesperson for the Beaufort Air Station, said Friday no additional details about the pilots or the investigation into the crash would be released because the crash is under investigation.

The Beaufort Gazette and Island Packet sent a detailed list of questions to Salinas on Friday about the pilots and the crash. The names of the pilots have not been publicly provided.

? There still is no official word on how close the jet was to the ground when the pilots ejected from the aircraft.

This story was originally published March 4, 2022 2:22 PM.

Seabrook neighbors’ spat over drainage pipe decided by SC Supreme Court

SEABROOK ISLAND — A neighborly dispute over a drainage pipe made it all the way to the S.C. Supreme Court last year, and justices recently decided the yearslong case will be resolved with just $1,000 in damages.It’s not uncommon for neighbors in the flood-prone Lowcountry to clash over drainage issues, but few cases make it to the state’s highest court.The seeds of the legal conflict were sown in 2002, when Paul Dennis McLaughlin and Susan Rode McLaughlin bought a lot on the island to build a home there, accor...

SEABROOK ISLAND — A neighborly dispute over a drainage pipe made it all the way to the S.C. Supreme Court last year, and justices recently decided the yearslong case will be resolved with just $1,000 in damages.

It’s not uncommon for neighbors in the flood-prone Lowcountry to clash over drainage issues, but few cases make it to the state’s highest court.

The seeds of the legal conflict were sown in 2002, when Paul Dennis McLaughlin and Susan Rode McLaughlin bought a lot on the island to build a home there, according to court documents. Their lot, like that of neighbors Richard Ralph and Eugenia Ralph, had a “no-build zone” with an underground, corroded drainage pipe.

A different drainage line on the golf course next door was installed that same year. The McLaughlins then spent the next six years talking to the island’s Property Owners Association about whether they could build on the section of their plot with the old pipe. They finally got permission to do so, and in 2008 told builders to remove their portion.

The Ralphs, however, protested that the corroded line was still helping to drain their yard of rainfall. When the McLaughlin’s section was removed, the Ralphs said flooding on their property got worse.

Ainsley Tillman, an attorney for the Ralphs, said the couple’s yard has ponding after it rains, and the standing water has drowned trees on the property.

That’s what led the couple to file their original suit, claiming trespass and intentional infliction of emotional distress, and asking for hundreds of thousands in damages. After a trial they were awarded just $1,000; despite winning, they appealed the amount of the court’s award.

An appeals court agreed there could be a new trial only over the amount of damages awarded. That’s the decision the state Supreme Court reversed on March 17 in a unanimous decision that reinstated the $1,000 payout and ended the case.

Tillman said her clients feel $1,000 is inadequate. Additionally, the legal fees the Ralphs spent so far “have not been insignificant,” Tillman said, but she declined to say exactly how big the bill was.

Hamlin O’Kelley, an attorney for the McLaughlins, declined to comment on the case and said his clients also would not comment.

But the saga may not be over: Tillman said the Ralphs are deciding whether they will ask the Supreme Court to re-hear the case, as they hope for a higher damage amount.

“When you are deciding whether or not to pursue an appeal in a case, they weigh the cost of litigation against the damage to your property,” Tillman said. “That’s kind of the balancing test.”

MUSC Foundation receives $1M from Town of Kiawah Island in support of Sea Islands Medical Pavilion

CHARLESTON, S.C. (Jan. 13, 2022) –The Medical University of South Carolina Foundation has received a commitment of $1 million from the Town of Kiawah Island in support of MUSC Health’s Sea Islands Medical Pavilion.“We are grateful to the Town of Kiawah for its major investment in our mission and their ongoing partnership to help us enable the right care, in the right place and at the right time,” said David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, MUSC president. “This donation will make a significant differ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (Jan. 13, 2022) –The Medical University of South Carolina Foundation has received a commitment of $1 million from the Town of Kiawah Island in support of MUSC Health’s Sea Islands Medical Pavilion.

“We are grateful to the Town of Kiawah for its major investment in our mission and their ongoing partnership to help us enable the right care, in the right place and at the right time,” said David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, MUSC president. “This donation will make a significant difference as we seek to improve the well-being of the Sea Islands community, expand access to appropriate care, and bolster connectivity to the state’s only comprehensive academic health system when patients require the most complex care.”

The donation has been designated for a healing, restful green space and garden immediately adjacent to the new facility. Construction on the Sea Islands project is expected to begin in early 2022 and conclude in fall 2023.

“The Town is proud to invest in MUSC's Sea Islands Medical Pavilion and excited about the emergent care services it will provide to Kiawah, Seabrook, Johns and Wadmalaw Islands, and the broader community,” said Town of Kiawah Mayor John D. Labriola. “Our geography has always been a challenge and concern. This new facility will make a crucial difference in life-threatening emergencies and provide the Sea Island communities with greater ease of mind. We are grateful to MUSC for their pursuit of this project, to Kiawah Partners for donating the land, and to the other community partners who have made this possible.”

During the next five years, double digit population growth is anticipated in the Sea Islands community. This growth, along with the islands' geographic isolation, demographics, and community health profiles, has created an urgent need for additional health care services in this part of the South Carolina Lowcountry.

The area also accommodates a large seasonal population of tourists, many of whom have trouble navigating local health care services.

To meet this growing need, MUSC Health is building a new medical facility on Johns Island in the immediate vicinity of Kiawah and Seabrook islands. The facility will provide residents and visitors alike with convenient and rapid access to MUSC Health’s emergency care services, select outpatient services, and some of the nation’s top providers in primary and specialty care.

“People living in this area have to travel 30 or 45 minutes to reach the nearest hospital, sometimes more depending on traffic. That’s a big problem for someone having a stroke or cardiac event,” said Patrick J. Cawley, M.D., MUSC Health CEO and vice president for Health Affairs, University. “This new facility brings that care directly into the community. We’re extremely grateful to the Town of Kiawah and Kiawah Partners for helping to make that possible.”

The project was made possible in part by Kiawah Partners, which donated six acres of land to the Medical University Hospital Authority (MUSC Health), valued at $4.85 million. The project is estimated to cost $24 million. Of that amount, MUSC is working to raise $15 million in private support.

The 22,740-square-foot facility will be located at 1884 Seabrook Island Road, near Bohicket Marina. The ED will include four exam rooms, two trauma rooms, imaging and lab services and a helicopter pad. The medical office will offer primary and specialty care. A telemedicine network will connect the entire facility to MUSC Health providers in downtown Charleston for additional care and consultation, if needed.

In mid-June 2021, McMillan Pazdan Smith (MPS) was chosen to design the project. MPS is also one of two architectural firms working on designs for a new MUSC Health hospital in rural Williamsburg County.

Renderings of the Sea Islands medical pavilion are available upon request.

###

About the MUSC Foundation

The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Foundation was chartered in 1966 as a charitable educational foundation to support the education, research, patient care and other programs at the Medical University. The foundation is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization, contributions to which are tax-deductible.

Since its beginning, the MUSC Foundation has encouraged such worthwhile academic enterprises as endowed professorships; scholarships; the acquisition and development of campus facilities to serve student, teaching, research or clinical needs; and awards in honor of academic excellence. In addition, it has encouraged achievements in biomedical research.

The Foundation is governed by a 31-member board of directors. The president of the Medical University is an ex-officio, non-voting member of the board. Three members of the MUSC Board of Trustees also serve on the board. The remaining 27 at-large directors are not directly affiliated with the university. Five are alumni of MUSC. The foundation’s funds are invested and managed by professional money managers selected by the foundation’s Investment Committee. This committee uses a professional investment advisor to assist in evaluating its managers.

About MUSC

Founded in 1824 in Charleston, MUSC is home to the oldest medical school in the South as well as the state’s only integrated academic health sciences center, with a unique charge to serve the state through education, research and patient care. Each year, MUSC educates and trains more than 3,000 students and nearly 800 residents in six colleges: Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy. MUSC brought in more than $327.6 million in biomedical research funds in fiscal year 2021, continuing to lead the state in obtaining federal and National Institutes of Health funding, with more than $220 million. For information on academic programs, visit musc.edu.

As the clinical health system of the Medical University of South Carolina, MUSC Health is dedicated to delivering the highest-quality and safe patient care while training generations of compassionate, competent health care providers to serve the people of South Carolina and beyond. Patient care is provided at 14 hospitals with approximately 2,500 beds and five additional hospital locations in development, more than 300 telehealth sites and nearly 750 care locations situated in the Lowcountry, Midlands, Pee Dee and Upstate regions of South Carolina. In 2021, for the seventh consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report named MUSC Health the No. 1 hospital in South Carolina. To learn more about clinical patient services, visit muschealth.org.

MUSC and its affiliates have collective annual budgets of $4.4 billion. The nearly 24,000 MUSC team members include world-class faculty, physicians, specialty providers, scientists, and care team members who deliver groundbreaking education, research, technology and patient care.

South Carolina's 1st sea turtle nest of 2021 season located in Charleston County

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — South Carolina's first sea turtle nest of the 2021 season has been found right in Charleston County!On Wednesday, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) biologists and volunteers announced that a mother loggerhead laid the first nest of the season overnight on Seabrook Island."Our staff and nest protection volunteers have been eagerly awaiting the arrival of the season’s first nest marking the return of these ancient reptiles," said SCDNR biologist Michelle Pa...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — South Carolina's first sea turtle nest of the 2021 season has been found right in Charleston County!

On Wednesday, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) biologists and volunteers announced that a mother loggerhead laid the first nest of the season overnight on Seabrook Island.

"Our staff and nest protection volunteers have been eagerly awaiting the arrival of the season’s first nest marking the return of these ancient reptiles," said SCDNR biologist Michelle Pate, who oversees the agency's sea turtle nesting program. "We're hopeful for a great season under the watchful eyes of our dedicated volunteer network members."

The nest was found by volunteers Sandy MacCoss and Lucy Hoover, who first located a crawl left by the mother sea turtle.

In 2020, 5,560 nests were laid. The year prior broke all records with 8,795 nests, but 2018 saw just 2,767 nests. Officials said female sea turtles do not come ashore to lay eggs each year, citing the high energy toll of nesting.

Each clutch averages 120 eggs, which typically hatch after about 60 days.

SCDNR provided the following tips for beachgoers and boaters to help keep sea turtles safe:

Report all sick/injured/dead sea turtles and nest disturbances to the SCDNR at 1-800-922-5431 so that staff/volunteers can respond as soon as possible.

Respect boating laws and boat cautiously, especially in small tidal creeks where sea turtles like to feed. Boat strikes have emerged as the leading cause of death for sea turtles in South Carolina.

Keep artificial lights off the beach at night during nesting season – this includes beachfront property lights and flash photography, which can disorient nesting mothers and hatchlings.

Always respect sea turtles by observing them from a distance on the beach. Individuals that violate federal law by harming or interfering with sea turtles or their nests can be subject to civil penalties of up to $25,000 and up to a year’s imprisonment.

Keep our beaches and ocean clean by avoiding single-use plastics. Plastic bags and balloons are among the most common trash items found on South Carolina beaches and can cause injury or death when sea turtles mistake them for food.

Promote and support our program for continued conservation of sea turtles in South Carolina.

The nesting season officially runs from May 1 through October 31, with hatchings usually beginning at the start of July.

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