Pressure Washingin Sullivan's Island, SC

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Pressure Washing Sullivan's Island, SC

Sullivan's Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Sullivan's Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Sullivan's Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Sullivan's Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Sullivan's Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Sullivan's Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Sullivan's Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Sullivan's Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Sullivan's Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Sullivan's Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we work with business owners across Sullivan's Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Sullivan's Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Sullivan's Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Sullivan's Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

Sullivan’s Island investigating illegal cutting of maritime forest

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is searching for those responsible for cutting down part of the island’s maritime forest. Town leaders are hoping to establish stricter penalties to prevent future cutting while residents are hoping the trees can be replaced.An employee with the town noticed the cutting around February 9th and reported it to town leaders leading to the town opening an investigation. Town leaders say preventing future cutting might be achieved through jail time or st...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The Town of Sullivan’s Island is searching for those responsible for cutting down part of the island’s maritime forest. Town leaders are hoping to establish stricter penalties to prevent future cutting while residents are hoping the trees can be replaced.

An employee with the town noticed the cutting around February 9th and reported it to town leaders leading to the town opening an investigation. Town leaders say preventing future cutting might be achieved through jail time or stricter fines.

“This is the epitome of selfishness,” says Town Councilman Scott Millimet reacting to the cutting.

Island residents were also upset with the cutting. “It’s clear these trees weren’t cut by accident, I mean they were purposefully cut to someone’s benefit,” says one resident.

A number of trees along Station 26, the width of a house were chopped and dropped in the town’s maritime forest. The island’s forest has become the center of a debate to save the town’s accredited land over the last several years.

“It damages everybody, it doesn’t just (damage) the two neighbors,” the resident said.

Dozens of trees have been marked and documented by town employees after being cut down. Councilman Millimet says residents couldn’t believe it when learning of the illegal cutting.

“General shock, frustration – bitterness,” says Councilman Millimet when referring to what he’s heard from residents.

Each tree cut down comes with a $1,040 fine but residents and leaders say that might not be enough to prevent future cutting.

“This just proves that there are those out there that until the punishment is enhanced, it’s going to continue,” says Councilman Millimet.

Councilman Millimet believes the fines should be raised and jail time considered for those responsible. “We can try to do some replanting,” says Councilman Millimet. “And then I think we also need to focus on enhancing the punishment.”

Advocates fighting for the future of the maritime forest agree with the measure. “While there are penalties, they are not severe enough to disincentive someone from potentially doing this again,” says Karen Byko, President of Sullivan’s Island 4 All.

With the damage already done along Station 26, leaders and residents hope they can stop additional chopping in the future.

“At the very least, I hope they replant these trees,” says the resident.

“There’s quite a bit of work to do but like I said we’ve got to get the ball rolling because the longer we wait, certain residents have shown that they will act in their own best interest and we’ve got to figure out how to prevent that,” says Councilman Millimet.

Town officials declined to provide a comment on the latest in the investigation.

Sullivan’s Island Retains Legal Counsel For Maritime Forest Settlement

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye NewsThe Sullivan’s Island Town Council has taken another major step in its efforts to abrogate a mediated agreement that permitted an increased amount of cutting in the town’s Maritime Forest. At its regularly scheduled meeting Feb. 15, the Council voted 5-1 to approve a motion to retain attorney William Wilkins to obtain a judicial determination as to whether any provision of the settlement agreement violates South Carolina law. “We’re retaining him to take legal action to d...

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

The Sullivan’s Island Town Council has taken another major step in its efforts to abrogate a mediated agreement that permitted an increased amount of cutting in the town’s Maritime Forest. At its regularly scheduled meeting Feb. 15, the Council voted 5-1 to approve a motion to retain attorney William Wilkins to obtain a judicial determination as to whether any provision of the settlement agreement violates South Carolina law. “We’re retaining him to take legal action to determine if the agreement is indeed enforceable. He will be filing for a declaratory judgment,” Mayor Pat O’Neil said. “This is a major step to determine if that agreement was indeed enforceable and legal.” The measure was passed after a 16-minute executive session. O’Neil and Council Members Bachman Smith, Scott Millimet, Gary Visser and Justin Novak voted to hire Wilkins to take another look at the agreement between the town and homeowners who live near the Maritime Forest. Kaye Smith voted no and Greg Hammond was not at the meeting; both of them were part of the Council that approved the settlement in October 2020. “I wish we were not in this position. This group did not put ourselves in this position,” O’Neil said.

“We’ve gotten good sound advice that the position we’re in is a bad one for the town going forward and in the present. I think we have no choice but to do this.” A major question Wilkins, who is with the Nexsen Pruet law firm in Greenville, will take to court will be whether one Council has the authority to bind the efforts of another Council for an indefinite period of time, O’Neil said.

Wilkins has served as chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth District and as U.S. District judge for the District of South Carolina. In September 2021, the Sullivan’s Island Council voted to hire him to take another look at the agreement, which was supposed to settle a lawsuit filed in July 2010. Wilkins determined that the settlement agreement might be invalid because it restricted the power of the Town Council; delegated the legislative and government powers of the town; and restricted the proprietary functions of the town. He wrote in a Nov. 30, 2021, letter that parts of the agreement are unenforceable and that “the provisions of the agreement that are not enforceable can’t be separated from the entire agreement.” Prior to the Feb. 15 vote, Kaye Smith pointed out that the issue “has been going on for 15 years and has cost hundreds and hundreds and thousands of dollars and has caused years of neglect in the accreted land prior to the mediated settlement.” She said the funds spent to hire Wilkins should be delegated to infrastructure, resiliency and maintenance on the island. “This will take many more years of litigation. I am opposed to this. I’m also opposed to unbinding future Councils. I’m in full support of letting the regulatory agencies have their say in what can be done with this current settlement agreement and moving forward from there and solving this issue once and for all.” Novak pointed out that “a significant number” of island residents have raised concerns that the settlement agreement might violate state law. “We are trustees of the legislative power vested in us by our constituents and have the duty to preserve and protect those powers. The only prudent course of action is to seek such a determination,” he commented. Both Millimet and Visser disagreed with Kaye Smith’s assertion that the Council’s action will be a waste of money. “We were elected and entrusted by the constituency largely to look into the settlement,” Millimet said. “We were obligated to move forward.” “I think it’s conveniently disingenuous to ignore the cost of ongoing cutting and maintenance and to complain about what the current litigation costs are,” Visser added. “I don’t think this is any issue at all in terms of cost.”

“This is a big deal for those of us who have been fighting for many years to preserve the Maritime Forest,” said Sullivan’s Island for All President Karen Byko. “The thought of a settlement that will remove thousands of trees is truly unbelievable. Tonight’s action is a long time in the making. All of this is a testament to the citizens who showed up to vote in a new Council, who supported Council’s efforts to save our Maritime Forest and at the same time advocated for this amazing natural resource that a small group of residents want to destroy for better views.”

Spring travel: 8 primo places for a beach getaway

Just in case you need a persuasive argument for carving out some serious beach time, here are several that will send you packing. Georgia’s convenient geographic location means seaside lovers have a nearby array of options, from the rugged coast of North Carolina’s Outer Banks to the serene emerald waters of Florida’s Gulf of Mexico shoreline. And don’t let the drive time detract from beach time. One of the joys of being an Atlanta-based traveler is that you can get just about anywhere in the world from the busiest ai...

Just in case you need a persuasive argument for carving out some serious beach time, here are several that will send you packing. Georgia’s convenient geographic location means seaside lovers have a nearby array of options, from the rugged coast of North Carolina’s Outer Banks to the serene emerald waters of Florida’s Gulf of Mexico shoreline. And don’t let the drive time detract from beach time. One of the joys of being an Atlanta-based traveler is that you can get just about anywhere in the world from the busiest airport, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International.

Cape Lookout National Seashore, N.C.

While this Atlantic coastal area offers multiple locations for soaking up the sun, it’s also a popular destination for nature lovers and sky watchers. The 56 miles of beach along the Outer Banks provide stellar spots for camping, swimming and fishing. Observe nature close-up among the dunes, grasslands, thickets and salt marshes where the wildlife ranges from beach-nesting species to sea turtles.

Stargazers of all ages head to Cape Lookout to study the sky far removed from artificial light. In December, the seashore was certified as an International Dark Sky Park, recognizing the extraordinary views it provides. The voluntary program encourages the preservation and protection of dark sites with environmentally responsible outdoor lighting and public education.

The local Crystal Coast Stargazers (ccgazers.com) offer monthly astronomy programs to point out the particulars of what’s starring overhead. “The dark skies are good for our resources, but they’re great for nighttime ecotourism, too,” says B.G. Horvat, interpretation and education chief. Check their Facebook page for upcoming free events including a Telescope and Astrophotography Workshop at Fort Macon State Park on March 18.

Cape Lookout National Seashore, 131 Charles St., Harkers Island, North Carolina. 252-728-2250, www.nps.gov/calo

Jekyll Island

Steeped in the history of powerful business tycoons with names such as Rockefeller and Vanderbilt, Jekyll Island is a favorite of those who want to step back into another era. Along with restored “cottage” mansions of the rich and once-famous, visitors will find a secluded destination that draws reunions, weddings and intimate gatherings. With the opening of the Courtyard/Residence Inn Jekyll Island ($195 and up, 178 S. Beachview Drive, 912-635-2764, www.marriott.com), visitors without deep millionaire pockets can enjoy the same unspoiled beauty that brought those A-listers of the late 1880s. The beachfront property provides immediate access to the surf and boasts the island’s largest heated pool, as well as a hot tub, kiddie splash pad, a fast-casual restaurant, fitness center and spa.

Jekyll Island Guest Information Center, 901 Downing Musgrove Causeway, Jekyll Island. 912-635-3636, www.jekyllisland.com

New Smyrna Beach, Fla.

It’s not just humans who love a beach break. Our canine friends do, too. At Joy By the Sea ($350 a night and up, 2901 S. Atlantic Ave, 386-428-0513, joybythesea.org), recently opened in New Smyrna Beach, dogs are welcome to bring their owners for fun in the sun. Situated within a few steps of the sand, the property features rental villas and homes surrounding a saltwater pool. At the northern tip of the town’s 17-mile beachfront, visitors and their dogs are welcome to frolic at the pet-friendly Smyrna Dune Park (2995 N. Peninsula Ave.). On the land side, more than three dozen dining destinations are happy to host owners and pets while serving up regional seafood favorites, locally crafted beers and plenty of laid back, casual cuisine.

New Smyrna Beach Area Visitors Bureau, 2238 State Road 44, New Smyrna Beach, Florida. 386-428-1600, www.visitnsbfl.com

Sullivan’s Island, S.C.

Just minutes from the historic attractions of downtown Charleston lies Sullivan’s Island, a 3.3-mile spit of sand that was first settled in the 17th century. Today, the barrier island near Charleston’s harbor is noted for its unspoiled beaches, water sports, bike paths through the marshes and plenty of places to cast a line. It’s also known for having no hotels: Visitors can book one of 200 rental homes that contribute to the island’s family-friendly, laid-back lifestyle. Dine like a local at The Longboard (small plates $14-$23, 2213-B, Middle St., 843-868-8161, thelongboardsullivans.com), a recently opened eatery that capitalizes on local seafood with raw and oyster bars, and entrees of octopus, prawns, mussels and more.

Charleston Convention and Visitors Bureau, 375 Meeting St., Charleston, South Carolina. 800-774-0006, www.charlestoncvb.com

Wilmington, N.C.

This city on the Cape Fear River boasts easy access to three beaches. Pick from the sandy stretches of Wrightsville, Kure and Carolina beaches to spread out a blanket and pop up an umbrella. Each has its own attractions, including Carolina’s beachside boardwalk, Kure’s Civil War-era Fort Fisher State Historic site and the North Carolina Aquarium, and Wrightsville’s water sports that include surfing and swimming as well as paddleboarding and kayaking along the intracoastal waterway.

A short drive from the water’s edge, Wilmington’s historic downtown is dotted with historic sites including the antebellum Bellamy Mansion and the World War II Battleship North Carolina. Both the beaches and town boast eateries where fresh seafood is the star. Stop by one of the newest dining destinations, Seabird (entrees $27-$32, 1 S. Front St., 910-769-5996, seabirdnc.com), located along the city’s famed Riverwalk. Husband-and-wife team Dean Neff and Lydia Clopton oversee an oyster bar and a menu of small plates and updated catches such as Eastern cioppino and mahi-mahi schnitzel.

Wilmington and Beaches Convention & Visitors Bureau, 1 Estell Lee Place, Wilmington, North Carolina. 910-341-4040, www.wilmingtonandbeaches.com

South Walton, Florida

Enjoy exceptional views of the Gulf of Mexico’s emerald waters from The Ivory Tower, a 2.5-story suite in The Court ($412 a night and up, 215 Quincy Circle, Santa Rosa Beach,866-595-7178, www.thecourtseaside.com), a new lodging on the secluded Santa Rosa beach. The multi-level space is the premier option among boutique guest residences built around a landscaped garden.

After a day of surfing, swimming, fishing and sunning, head to the Central Square for fine dining, shopping and wine walks, or sign up for an art class at the Gulf Place artists colony. Enjoy local cuisine at recently opened eateries The Citizen, specializing in fresh gulf catches, and Scratch Biscuit Kitchen, serving hearty breakfasts and lunches.

Explore the nearby Point Washington State Forest’s 15,000 acres where the Panhandle’s ecosystem is on display. With 40% of land off-limits for development, South Walton is noted for its dunes, forests, lakes and expansive beach.

Visit South Walton Florida, 25777 U.S. Highway 331 South, Santa Rosa Beach, Florida. 800-822-6877, www.visitsouthwalton.com

Providenciales, Turks & Caicos

If traveling responsibly is part of your destination decision, head to the Ocean Club Resorts – East or West ($305 and up, 118 Grace Bay Road and 54 Bonaventure Crescent, Grace Bay Beach, 649-946-5880, www.oceanclubeast.com, www.oceanclubwest.com) in the Turks & Caicos islands. The all-suite resorts recently earned the first Green Globe certification in the islands by using eco-friendly approaches such as replacing plastic straws and Styrofoam containers, using LED lighting and offering reusable shopping bags in each suite.

Guests are welcome to hop on the complimentary transportation between the two resorts and check out the multiple pools and restaurants, and to discover the area’s natural beauty on bikes, kayaks or paddleboards. But the resorts’ jewel in the crown is the location on Grace Bay Beach on the northeast coast of Providenciales island, a protected barrier-reef coastline with no rocks, swells or seaweed. The pristine setting has earned numerous awards as one of the world’s top beach destinations. Enjoy it from a comfy beach chair under an Ocean Club’s signature pink umbrella.

Turks & Caicos Tourism, Regent House, Ventura Drive, Providenciales, Turks & Caicos Islands. 800-241-0824, www.turksandcaicostourism.com

Tybee Island

Long hailed as a haven for family vacationers, Tybee is noted for its laid-back lifestyle and affordable accommodations. Its Atlantic Ocean coastline presents plenty of fun pastimes, from collecting shells to bodysurfing. But the island is also home to calmer waterways that make paddleboarding and kayaking easy. Fishing, biking and dolphin tours are added attractions.

Mix a bit of education into your stay with a visit to the 5,000-square-foot Tybee Island Marine Science Center ($10, 37 Meddin Drive, 912-786-5917, www.tybeemarinescience.org) on the island’s north side, close to the lighthouse. Along with touch tanks, floating classrooms and life-sized replicas of sea turtles, the facility is home to the Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary that highlights an underwater park. The center hosts a variety of activities for kids, including beach treks, boat trips and sea camp.

Tybee Island Visitors Center, 802 1st St., Tybee Island. 877-344-3361, www.visittybee.com

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